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Video: Gov. pauses re-opening of some businesses as COVID-19 cases rise


Gov. Doug Ducey Says Arizonans Need To Take Action To Reduce COVID-19 Cases During A June 25, 2020 News Conference. Photo Courtesy Of Arizona Dept. Of Health Services

Updated June 29: Gov. Doug Ducey said the re-opening of some Arizona businesses remains on pause due to an increase in COVID-19 cases during a news conference today.

Click here for more recent schools and COVID-19 updates

In addition, Gov. Ducey delayed the re-opening of schools’ in-person classes until August 17 due to the increase in confirmed COVID-19 cases during a news conference this afternoon.

Click here for Video: Gov. delays first day of in-person classes to Aug. 17 due to rise in COVID-19

Confirmed COVID-19 cases in Arizona rose to 74,533 today from 73,908 yesterday, and 1,588 have died from the virus, said the Arizona Department of Health Services.

Arizona Dept. of Health Services: COVID-19 News Conference June 29, 2020

In Maricopa County, there are 45,178 confirmed cases of COVID-19, 7,568 in Pima County, 5,882 in Yuma County, 3,570 in Navajo County, 3,382 in Pinal County, 2,309 in Apache County, 1,850 in Coconino County, 1,717 in Santa Cruz County, 1,028 in Mohave County, 755 in Yavapai County, 580 in Cochise County, 332 in La Paz County, 271 in Gila County, 92 in Graham County and 18 in Greenlee County.

Video: Gov. pauses re-opening of some businesses as COVID-19 cases rise 6-29-Summary-738x1024

Pendergast Elementary School District reminds community members that free COVID-19 drive through testing is available at South Mountain Community College on July 2 & 3 and July 9 & 10.

Tucson Unified School District’s re-opening plan includes more money and space to reduce the risk of COVID-19 among students and staff.

Tempe Elementary schools kindergarten screenings continue July 13 and 14 at Bustoz Professional Learning Center.

Mesa Public Schools initial school opening plan is up online and an updated plan will be released on July 14.

Now is the time to analyze what worked and what didn’t when schools moved to distance learning in response to the coronavirus pandemic, Fordham Institute says.

Khan Academy shares ideas to keep everyone learning this summer.

Dysart Unified School District will post the virtual graduation ceremonies of its seniors on YouTube today at 11 a.m. to celebrate students achievements.

Building Assets, Reducing Risks (BARR Center) shares what students say their teachers taught them.

Rio Rico High School shares the accomplishments of it’s graduating high school seniors in Border Eco Magazine.

Excel in Ed shares how states can improve college- going opportunities like Advanced Placement (AP), Cambridge Advanced International Certificate of Education (AICE), College-Level Examination Program (CLEP), dual enrollment, early college high schools and International Baccalaureate (IB) and outcomes for their students in their Accelerating Students from High School to College and Careers playbook for state policymakers

College Goal Arizona reminds students there’s still time to complete their FAFSA to qualify for financial aid.

Peoria Unified and arizonafamily’s Surprise Squad honored a Peoria Unified School District employees who has served children in the district for the past 45 years.

EdTrust is conducting a national survey of Black students debt to better understand how they are affected.

Pendergast Elementary School District reminds you that today is National Camera Day.

More than 30% of residents in 7 of Arizona’s 15 counties can’t access broadband, the Greater Phoenix Chamber says.

Updated June 28: The single highest number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in a single day so far – 3,858 – in Arizona were reported on Sunday.

Confirmed COVID-19 cases in Arizona rose to 73,908 today from 70,051 Saturday, and 1,588 have died from the virus, said the Arizona Department of Health Services.

In Maricopa County, there are 44,962 confirmed cases of COVID-19, 7,525 in Pima County, 5,781 in Yuma County, 3,537 in Navajo County, 3,350 in Pinal County, 2,303 in Apache County, 1,819 in Coconino County, 1,698 in Santa Cruz County, 1,004 in Mohave County, 668 in Yavapai County, 561 in Cochise County, 328 in La Paz County, 268 in Gila County, 85 in Graham County and 18 in Greenlee County.

Video: Gov. pauses re-opening of some businesses as COVID-19 cases rise 6-28-Summary-732x1024

Updated June 25: Gov. Doug Ducey said that this is Arizona’s first wave of COVID-19, but not its last during a news conference this afternoon.

“The rate of the spread of this virus in unacceptable and it’s time for us to step up our actions and personal responsibility in response to this virus,” Gov. Ducey said.

AZ Dept. of Health Services video: Arizona COVID-19 briefing June 25, 2020

“As we have all come to realize, COVID-19 has changed our world and not just in Arizona,” Gov. Ducey said.

“COVID-19 is widespread in Arizona, its in all 15 of our counties and it’s growing and growing fast across all age groups and demographics,” Gov. Ducey said.

The numbers speak for themselves, Gov. Ducey said.

Confirmed COVID-19 cases in Arizona rose to 63,030 today from 59,974 yesterday, and 1,490 have died from the virus, said the Arizona Department of Health Services.

In Maricopa County, there are 37,135 confirmed cases of COVID-19, 6,546 in Pima County, 5,113 in Yuma County, 3,311 in Navajo County, 2,912 in Pinal County, 2,235 in Apache County, 1,676 in Coconino County, 1,587 in Santa Cruz County, 881 in Mohave County, 564 in Yavapai County, 468 in Cochise County, 299 in La Paz County, 216 in Gila County, 70 in Graham County and 17 in Greenlee County.

Video: Gov. pauses re-opening of some businesses as COVID-19 cases rise 6-25-summary-720x1024

“This is Arizona’s first wave and this will not be our last wave,” Gov. Ducey said.

Arizona is one of seven states hitting a daily records of hospitalizations, Gov. Ducey said.

“We do need to change directions on these numbers,” Gov. Ducey said.

Arizona will remain vigilant, flexible and humble as this virus presents new challenges at every turn, Gov. Ducey said.

“We expect our numbers will be worse next week and the week following in numbers of cases and hospitalizations,” Gov. Ducey said.

“We want to save lives and protect livelihoods,” Gov. Ducey said.

The best way to help do this is to wear a mask, that will make a real difference in slowing the spread of this virus, Gov. Ducey said.

We need to keep our physical distance, wahs our hands and stay home when sick, Gov. Ducey said.

Arizonans had 45 days of the stay at home order to slow the spread of the virus so we could prepare for the surge in hospitalization we’re seeing today, Gov. Ducey said.

“You are safer at home. All Arizonans are safer at home and you can stay healthy at home,” Gov. Ducey said.

“You can help reduce the risk for the most vulnerable in our society and reduce the burden on our hospitals,” Gov. Ducey said.

AZ. Dept. of Health Services Director Dr. Cara Christ encouraged people to wear a mask when outside of their home.

Video: Gov. pauses re-opening of some businesses as COVID-19 cases rise 6-26-dr-christ
Dr. Cara Christ

“You need to consider if you go out if you can keep 6 feet away from other people,” Dr. Christ said. “Indoor spaces are more risky than outdoor spaces were there is more ventilation and space.”

“We consider a close contact with someone interacting with people for more than 10 minutes within six feet of space,” Dr. Christ said.

Not all businesses have taken steps to protect their employees and customers and enforcement actions against several businesses have been taken, Gov. Ducey said.

Video: Gov. pauses re-opening of some businesses as COVID-19 cases rise 6-26-bad-actors-2

Arizona is seeing growth in the number of COVID-19 cases among young adults, and warned they could spread it to more vulnerable adults, Gov. Ducey said.

“There is no consideration of increasing activity. Arizona is on pause,” Gov. Ducey said. “The last several weeks we’ve been on an upward trajectory and it needs to be reversed.”

‘This is the wrong direction, and we need to reverse this trend,” Gov. Ducey said.

The increase of positive COVID-19 tests is another trend that needs to be reversed,” Gov. Ducey said.

We have less availability in hospital beds, we have more hospital beds and and ICU beds in use, and we’re seeing increased use of ventilators, Gov. Ducey said.

“We are going to increase testing in Arizona. It gives us more information to make decisions,” Gov. Ducey said.

When asked if there will be another Stay at Home order in the future, Gov. Ducey said it’s a tool that works and we want to use the tools that work, but we don’t need to use that right now.

Staff at some immigration detention centers are worried about dealing with COVID-19, KJZZ reports.

Arizona State University reaches out to help Native Americans in Arizona during COVID-19 by delivering test kits and providing public health support.

University of Arizona’s presidents is concerned that the increase in COVID-19 cases might impact the school’s re-opening.

Now, Maricopa Community College presidents are recommending canceling the 2020-21 athletic season.

Parents and teachers can talk with children to help intercept harmful racial stereotypes and normalize difference, The Hechinger Report says.

Veterans have gathered signatures to demand the removal of a Confederate monument from the capitol, KJZZ 91.5 FM reports.

NASA is naming its agency’s headquarters building Washington, D.C. after Mary 1. Jackson, the first Black woman engineer at the space agency, said its administrator Jim Bridenstine.

National School Boards Association Chief Legal Officer will be on the June 26 edition of Es Teimpo to talk about the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision on DACA.

Twelve ASU Cronkite School students will be working on a team to investigate the juvenile justice system.

Horizon Honors Schools posted it’s back to school plan with learning choices parents need to make by June 30.

About 77 percent of high school students interested in STEM careers in 2009 and 2012 were male, according to the National Center for Education Statistics.

Trying to reach a college admissions officer? There are plenty of tools to do that virtually, says U.S. News & World Report.

The new Magic School Bus film will feature Elizabeth Banks.

And a quick reminder from NALEO during Pride Month that if you haven’t responded to Census 2020 yet, there’s still time to go online or respond by phone or by mail.

Updated June 24: Gov. Doug Ducey issued an Executive Order and unveiled a plan with the Arizona Department of Education today that provide instruction flexibility and additional funding as schools re-open with COVID-19 precautions in place.

Click here to learn more about the plan that provides more funding, flexible instruction as schools re-open

Some states now require Arizonans to quarantine after they arrive because of the high incidence of COVID-19 here, and more are considering a travel ban for Arizonans and people from other COVID-19 hotspots, according to an azfamily.com article.

Confirmed COVID-19 cases in Arizona rose to 59,974 today from 58,179 yesterday, and 1,463 have died from the virus, said the Arizona Department of Health Services.

In Maricopa County, there are 34,992 confirmed cases of COVID-19, 6,318 in Pima County, 4,915 in Yuma County, 3,248 in Navajo County, 2,778 in Pinal County, 2,194 in Apache County, 1,611 in Coconino County, 1,538 in Santa Cruz County, 841 in Mohave County, 521 in Yavapai County, 441 in Cochise County, 289 in La Paz County, 201 in Gila County, 71 in Graham County and 16 in Greenlee County.

Arizona Dept. of Health Services Video: Help Slow the Spread of COVID-19

Video: Gov. pauses re-opening of some businesses as COVID-19 cases rise 6-24-summary-754x1024

People 20 to 44 years old had the largest number of confirmed COVID-19 cases at 28,843, followed by people 45 to 54 years old with 9,288 cases, then people from 55 to 64 years old with 7,318 cases, people 65 years and older with 7,723 cases and people under 20 years old with 6,697 cases, in 105 cases the age of the person is unknown, according to the Arizona Department of Health Services.

Forty-three percent of confirmed COVID-19 cases are in people of unknown race/ethnicity, 26% in Hispanic or Latino, 16% in White/Non-Hispanic, 9% Native American, 2% Black/Non-Hispanic and 1% Asian/ Pacific Islander and 2% Other/Non-Hispanic.

Twenty-one percent of people who had confirmed COVID-19 cases had a chronic medical condition and 28% were high risk – 65 or more years old with one or more chronic medical condition. Fifty-two percent of people with confirmed cases of COVID-19 are female.

Update June 23: A record high of 3,591 new confirmed COVID-19 cases were reported today when President Donald Trump will visit Phoenix to speak at an event organized by students and Yuma to visit the border wall under construction.

About 20 minutes before the end of the Trump rally, Phoenix Police deployed pepper balls & pepper spray saying it was an unlawful assembly and would not let medics through to treat injured people, according to Briana Whitney with CBS 5 and 3 TV part of azfamily.

Confirmed COVID-19 cases in Arizona rose to 58,179 today from 54,586 Monday, and 1,384 have died from the virus, said the Arizona Department of Health.

In Maricopa County, there are 33,883 confirmed cases of COVID-19, 6,089 in Pima County, 4,591 in Yuma County, 3,166 in Navajo County, 2,704 in Pinal County, 2,165 in Apache County, 1,595 in Coconino County, 1,521 in Santa Cruz County, 813 in Mohave County, 510 in Yavapai County, 432 in Cochise County, 286 in La Paz County, 192 in Gila County, 66 in Graham County and 18 in Greenlee County.

Video: Gov. pauses re-opening of some businesses as COVID-19 cases rise 6-23-summary-743x1024

Teachers are helping students understand what’s happening now, even when they aren’t in the classroom.

Students of color challenge schools to do more to address racism, in and Arizona Republic article.

Children do better when parents are honest about tragedy, The Atlantic reports.

While Arizonans were protesting, muralists have honored the movement on walls in downtown Phoenix.

National Public Radio wants to hear what your favorite picture books and easy chapter books are for young children.

Interested in teachers use of technology in learning? Take a look at this data.

Here are some tips to create a calm learning environment for preschoolers from Edutopia.

Update June 22: The Joint Legislative Budget Committee released a June Budget Update on Friday, June 19 that indicates Arizona’s shortfall in the budget could be $708 million, less than the $1.1 billion what they originally predicted in April due to the economic effects of the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic.

“The economy has performed better than we anticpated in this the fourth quarter of fiscal 20,” said Richard Stavneak, director of the Joint Legislative Budget Committee.

“In the current fiscal year, we are forecasting a shortfall of just under $200 million, and then we would incur an additional $500 million in fiscal 21,” Stavneak said.

Click here for links to the June Budget Update

“Now there remains in the economy, great uncertainty about what the next year will look like,” Stavneak said. “As a result that (fiscal year) 21 balance could range from a balanced budget to a $1 billion shortfall.”

Several factors will influence that outcome, including a potential for a second wave of COVID-19 and the government’s policy response, the availability and effectiveness of a future vaccine, the willingness of the public to resume normal activities and the governor’s plan for allocating federal COVID resources, Stavneak said.

Meanwhile, confirmed COVID-19 cases in Arizona rose to 54,586 today from 52,390 Sunday, and 1,342 have died from the virus, said the Arizona Department of Health.

In Maricopa County, there are 31,650 confirmed cases of COVID-19, 5,587 in Pima County, 4,591 in Yuma County, 3,037 in Navajo County, 2,459 in Pinal County, 2,121 in Apache County, 1,541 in Coconino County, 1,482 in Santa Cruz County, 723 in Mohave County, 490 in Yavapai County, 372 in Cochise County, 279 in La Paz County, 176 in Gila County, 65 in Graham County and 13 in Greenlee County.

Video: Gov. pauses re-opening of some businesses as COVID-19 cases rise 06-22-summary

Women have been especially hard hit by the economic impact of the coronavirus pandemic, CNN says.

College Success Arizona says it’s time to address racism in education and the workforce.

A New Leaf in Phoenix offers on-line support and classes to help you land your next job.

Dysart Unified School District today cancelled its in-person graduation ceremonieshttps://azednews.com/dysart-graduation-ceremonies-cancelled-due-to-health-concerns/, originally planned for June 30 at State Farm Stadium due to health concerns with the COVID-19 pandemic.

Instead, Dysart will celebrate and honor each and every 2020 graduate at drive-through celebrations at each school on June 30 where students will receive their diplomas and a virtual graduation ceremony video for each high school at 11:00 a.m. on June 29.

Balsz School District reminds families and community members that learning resources, COVID-19 updates, meal info and more are available on their Family Resource Hub.

Dysart Unified reminds families that this is the last week of its Grab and Go meal service this summer.

Hear more about how Arizona State University professor Lekelia “Kiki” Jenkins is helping shape the future of ocean science.

Student athletes at several colleges have tested positive for COVID-19, Education Week says.

Sunnyside Unified is seeking nominations for their alumni hall of fame.

Despite widespread attention to inequitable school funding formulas — and courts that have declared them unlawful for shortchanging school districts serving large percentages of low-income students — too many states continue this unfair practice, says an article in The Education Trust.

English Language Learners need more support during remote learning, says Education Week.

Update June 21: Confirmed COVID-19 cases in Arizona rose to 52,390 Sunday from 46,689 Friday, and 1,339 have died from the virus, said the Arizona Department of Health.

Friday’s 3,246 new confirmed COVID-19 cases was Arizona’s highest one-day case increase yet. The trend continued on Saturday with 3,109 new confirmed COVID-19 cases.

Last week, cities across Arizona started requiring people to wear masks when out in public, and Gov. Doug Ducey asked the National Guard to aid in contact tracing, ABC 15 Arizona said.

In Maricopa County, there are 30,136 confirmed cases of COVID-19, 5,370 in Pima County, 4,403 in Yuma County, 3,009 in Navajo County, 2,357 in Pinal County, 2,117 in Apache County, 1,536 in Coconino County, 1,413 in Santa Cruz County, 721 in Mohave County, 456 in Yavapai County, 363 in Cochise County, 273 in La Paz County, 160 in Gila County, 63 in Graham County and 13 in Greenlee County.

Video: Gov. pauses re-opening of some businesses as COVID-19 cases rise 6-21-Summary

Update June 19: Juneteenth events have always commemorated the day 155 years ago when news of the Emancipation Proclamation reached the last enslaved Black people in Texas, but this year events in Arizona will be focused on the present Arizona organizers told Cronkite News Service.

Confirmed COVID-19 cases reached a new single day high today of 3,245 new cases in Arizona.

Confirmed COVID-19 cases in Arizona rose to 46,689 today from 43,443 yesterday, and 1,312 have died from the virus, said the Arizona Department of Health.

In Maricopa County, there are 25,999 confirmed cases of COVID-19, 5,019 in Pima County, 3,857 in Yuma County, 2,928 in Navajo County, 2,130 in Pinal County, 2,103 in Apache County, 1,470 in Coconino County, 1,293 in Santa Cruz County, 686 in Mohave County, 417 in Yavapai County, 332 in Cochise County, 257 in La Paz County, 125 in Gila County, 59 in Graham County and 14 in Greenlee County.

Video: Gov. pauses re-opening of some businesses as COVID-19 cases rise 6-19-20-summary

A partnership has developed a virtual summer school to help children avoid the summer slide, Arizona Board of Regents said.

Crane School District said two more staff members have tested positive for COVID-19.

Some Yuma Union High School District student athletes have started practicing in a limited way this week.

Tech can help keep students attention during online learning, Edutopia says.

Teachers retiring during COVID-19 feel like they’re fading away, says Education Week.

Update June 18: The U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5-4 today that Dreamers retain key protections, and blocked President Donald Trump’s administration’s efforts to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals.

That means that the hundreds of thousands of undocumented immigrants brought to the United States as children keep deportation protections and work permits under the DACA program.

“The dispute before the Court is not whether DHS may rescind DACA. All parties agree that it may. The dispute is instead primarily about the procedure the agency followed in doing so,” said Chief Justice John Roberts who wrote the ruling.

“We do not decide whether DACA or its rescission are sound policies. ‘The wisdom’ of those decisions ‘is none of our concern.’ We address only whether the agency complied with the procedural requirement that it provide a reasoned explanation for its action,” said Chief Justice Roberts who joined Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Elena Kagan, Stephen Breyer and Sonia Sotomayor in the decision.

“Here the agency failed to consider the conspicuous issues of whether to retain forbearance and what if anything to do about the hardship to DACA recipients. That dual
failure raises doubts about whether the agency appreciated the scope of its discretion or exercised that discretion in a reasonable manner. The appropriate recourse is therefore
to remand to DHS so that it may consider the problem anew,” Chief Justice Roberts wrote in the decision.

Confirmed COVID-19 cases in Arizona reach a new single day high of 2,519 new cases.

Confirmed COVID-19 cases in Arizona rose to 43,443 today from 40,924 yesterday, and 1,271 have died from the virus, said the Arizona Department of Health.

In Maricopa County, there are 23,880 confirmed cases of COVID-19, 4,682 in Pima County, 2,874 in Navajo County, 1,439 in Coconino County, 1,888 in Pinal County, 402 in Yavapai County, 1,998 in Apache County, 3,635 in Yuma County, 676 in Mohave County, 267 in Cochise County, 1,210 in Santa Cruz County, 58 in Graham County, 245 in La Paz County, 115 in Gila County and 13 in Greenlee County.

Video: Gov. pauses re-opening of some businesses as COVID-19 cases rise 6-18-Summary

Tolleson Union High School announced today that each school in the district will celebrate graduation with drive-thru events at their campuses on June 29th with the exception of University High School, which will hold their event at the Tolleson Union High School District office.

Education Week provides some Q&A posts from the past nine years on race and racism in schools.

Chalkbeat is seeking students’ six-word stories about their feelings and experiences with Black Lives Matter protests, police actions and more.

As Juneteenth, when enslaved Blacks in Galveston, Texas, first learned about the Emancipation Proclamation that freed them had been signed by President Abraham Lincoln two-and-a-half years earlier, is commemorated tomorrow Arizona Informant Newspaper Publisher Cloves Campbell Jr. talks to KJZZ 91.5 FM about it.

Juneteenth is gaining traction as a workers’ holiday, and more than 24 businesses in Arizona and nationwide will be closed tomorrow for it, The Arizona Republic says.

Phoenix New Times highlights events in Phoenix to observe Juneteenth.

A federal court judge struck down the U.S. Dept. of Education’s policy to exclude undocumented college students from receiving coronavirus relief grants but the agency is fighting it.

School districts around the state are seeking bus drivers before school starts.

NotMyKid’s Kristen Polin talks about the toll the quarantine has had on teens’ mental health with KJZZ 91.5 FM.

Update June 17: Gov. Doug Ducey said, “COVID-19 is widespread in the State of Arizona, and Arizonans must act responsibly to protect one another,” in a news conference today.

“We want to see all Arizonans wear masks, and we are working with local leaders to have that flexibility,” Gov. Ducey said.

Gov. Ducey thanked the mayors around the state for their input that they wanted flexibility on being able to require residents to wear masks and face coverings depending on the rate of coronavirus infection in their area and they have flexibility on enforcement efforts as one way to reduce the spread of COVID-19 in their communities.

Arizona Dept. of Health Services video: COVID-19 News Conference June 17, 2020

On some things a statewide order works well, but in rural Arizona where there is very little transmission and you have counties that say “pound sand” on an executive order and that doesn’t work, Gov. Ducey said.

“We are not out of the woods yet,” Gov. Ducey said.

“First and foremost we want people to stay healthy,” Gov. Ducey said. “We want to slow and contain the spread. We have successfully slowed the spread of COVID-19 in the past and we’re going to slow it again.”

“We will take urgent action to protect health,” Gov. Ducey said. “We will be vigilant constantly as this virus is tough and challenging on every front.”

“I said two weeks ago that there was not a trend here. Looking at the last two weeks of data there is a trend and they’re in the wrong directions,” Gov. Ducey said. “The actions we’re going to take are going to change this trend.”

“What we will see in the actions we take today is a downward trend in cases” along with an increase in testing, Gov. Ducey said.

We’ve partnered with ASU to develop a test that gives on-site rapid results that can be used in workplaces, Gov. Ducey said.

Dr. Cara Christ, director of Arizona Department of Health Services, talked about updated guidance from the U.S. Centers from Disease Control to consider before leaving home.

Video: Gov. pauses re-opening of some businesses as COVID-19 cases rise 6-17-Dr.-Christ

“We always recommend that you stay six feet away from other individuals, the closer you are the greater your risk of COVID-19,” Dr. Christ said.

Indoor spaces with less ventilation increases your risk compared to outdoors where air circulation is greater, Dr. Christ said.

Dr. Christ said they are testing one corrections facility each week and they’re working on corrections to test all inmates in conjunction with private lab partners.

Arizona Dept. of Health Services has tested almost 15,000 long-term care staff and residents for COVID-19 and 21 homes are doing their own testing, Dr. Christ said.

Video: Gov. pauses re-opening of some businesses as COVID-19 cases rise 6-17-Gov-Ducey-4

“You are most safe at home. If you can’t stay home and you go out, you are most safe when you physically distance and if you do go out, wear a mask. It’s the smart thing to do,” Gov. Ducey said.

To give you an idea of how different things are in different parts of our state, and in response, Gov. Ducey said he is changing requirements allowing local leaders to tailor requirements on whether to require masks and apply enforcement.

“Facts around the state are demanding an individualized approach,” Gov. Ducey said.

Video: Gov. pauses re-opening of some businesses as COVID-19 cases rise 6-17-Ducey-state-differences

“Studies speak to the effectiveness of these face masks. Every Arizonan should wear a face mask and we’re asking Arizonans to do their part to protect the most vulnerable in their communities,” Gov. Ducey said.

The AZ Dept of Health services is strengthening measures to protect patrons and employees of establishments, Gov. Ducey said.

“For those operating responsibly there will be no change,” Gov. Ducey said.

“The objective here in addition to keep Arizonans healthy is to slow and contain the spread,” Gov. Ducey said.

Contact tracing is being stepped up at the county level with help from the National Guard, Gov. Ducey said.

“If you do get contacted by public health, please answer the call. They have information for you about someone wjo has tested positive that you have come into contact with,” Gov. Ducey said.

“Just recently I know a lot of people who have contracted this and they’ve contracted this as graduation parties in private homes,” Gov. Ducey said.

There will be additional testing for residents and staff in high contact settings such as long-term care homes, Gov. Ducey said.

“We’re going to continue to boost testing,” Gov. Ducey said. “We’re going to amplify contact tracing with the counties.”

“We’re also going to have increased awareness of distancing and face-covering guidelines. We’ll empower local officials to provide additional requirements. and we’ll continue our focus on long-term care facilities,” Gov. Ducey said.

“Serious changes need to be made and enforcement efforts will be made around those requirements,” Gov. Ducey said.

“COVID-19 is widespread in the State of Arizona and Arizonans must act responsibly to protect one another,” Gov. Ducey said.

Confirmed COVID-19 cases in Arizona rose to 40,924 today from 39,097 yesterday, and 1,239 have died from the virus, said the Arizona Department of Health.

In Maricopa County, there are 22,272 confirmed cases of COVID-19, 4,385 in Pima County, 2,771 in Navajo County, 1,410 in Coconino County, 1,793 in Pinal County, 387 in Yavapai County, 1,998 in Apache County, 3,454 in Yuma County, 636 in Mohave County, 248 in Cochise County, 1,165 in Santa Cruz County, 56in Graham County, 238 in La Paz County, 99 in Gila County and 12 in Greenlee County.

Video: Gov. pauses re-opening of some businesses as COVID-19 cases rise 6-17-summary

Arizona Cardinals Quarterback Kyler Murray says it’s not enough to not be racist, we’ve got to be anti-racist in response to the protests against racism and police brutality.

In Phoenix, protesters are gathered around different workshops to learn, participate and hear more from organizers.

Nextgen Arizona and March For Our Lives Arizona will host a town hall next Wednesday of achieving racial justice and equity in Arizona.

Schools and parents might want to consider building mindful routines for students as they head back to school, Education Next says.

Peoria Unified thanked their Food and Nutrition team for providing students in summer camps with meals each day.

Students and their families are reminded that filling out the FAFSA is an important step in applying for college.

Sahuarita Unified is the first school in the state to offer NJROTC course to eighth-graders.

Maricopa County Supt. of Schools Steve Watson encouraged teachers to register for upcoming workshops like this one.

Update June 16: Fountain Hills students who planned a protest in support of the Black Lives Matter movement canceled the event after social media threats of an armed response, The Arizona Republic reports.

Give people who can help a seat at the table to come up with solutions for education issues related to race as well as COVID, an Education Week article says.

School resource officers may be replaced in Tempe Union High School district by social workers or mental health professionals, 12 News says.

Confirmed COVID-19 cases in Arizona rose to 39,097 today from 36,705 Monday, and 1,219 have died from the virus, said the Arizona Department of Health.

In Maricopa County, there are 20,775 confirmed cases of COVID-19, 4,329 in Pima County, 2,749 in Navajo County, 1,393 in Coconino County, 1,727 in Pinal County, 384 in Yavapai County, 1,996 in Apache County, 3,379 in Yuma County, 624 in Mohave County, 241 in Cochise County, 1,104 in Santa Cruz County, 55 in Graham County, 238 in La Paz County, 91 in Gila County and 12 in Greenlee County.

Video: Gov. pauses re-opening of some businesses as COVID-19 cases rise 6-16-summary

As unemployment applications for benefits increased in Arizona during the coronavirus pandemic and layoffs, investigations of fraud have delayed benefits for some people, The Arizona Republic reports.

As the nation awaits the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision on Dreamers, an Ambassador of Mexico to the United States points out that many Dreamers are providing essential services during COVID-19.

Social distancing and slowed down screening of young children for developmental delays, First Things First said.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a video game as a treatment for children between the ages of 8 and 12 with some types of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, a CNN story says.

Deer Valley Unified’s student athletes are beginning summer training.

Earning certificates through dual enrollment can help high school students in the job search after graduation, an edutopia article says.

Arizona high school seniors can still fill out the FAFSA, College Goal Arizona says.

Looking for a place to cool off with the kids? Raising Arizona Kids has some ideas.

Edutopia provides some ideas for meeting IEP goals during remote learning.

Update June 15: Some delayed traditional graduation ceremonies have been cancelled as COVID-19 cases continue to rise.

Peoria Unified School District sent a letter to parents today cancelling its in-person graduation ceremony scheduled to take place June 25, 26, and 27.

“Given the increase in COVID-19 cases, we have determined it is not in the best interest of our students, staff, parents and community to proceed with these events,” the letter said.

“As we shared in our recent survey communication, the Arizona Department of Health Services (ADHS) has released guidance recommending that mass events, specifically graduations, do not take place at this time. We received this guidance at the beginning of June but were hopeful that our state would begin to see a decline in cases. As recently as this morning, we reached out to the county again to see if the guidance had changed and unfortunately, it has not,” the letter continued.

“Safety has always been our first priority and we do not feel we can in good conscience proceed with an event that may jeopardize the health and well-being of our graduates, families and staff.  We are devastated that we will not be able to celebrate our graduates for their achievements in the way we had originally planned and in the way that they deserve,” the letter read.

Last week, Tolleson Union High School District cancelled it’s planned in-person graduation ceremonies scheduled for June 29 last week.

“We do, however, want to celebrate our graduates and recognize their accomplishment in a meaningful way. Our seniors have missed a lot this year, and we want to be sure to acknowledge them in a special way to the best of our ability. Currently, schools are working on a plan to celebrate and honor our graduates with a celebration at each school site. Principals will be sending out a communication to you soon with information on the graduation celebration at your home school,” the letter sent to parents on June 11 read.

On Thursday, June 18, Tolleson Union High School sent out a news release that each school in the district will celebrate graduation with events at their school campus on June 29th with the exception of University High School which will hold their event at the Tolleson Union High School District office.

Confirmed COVID-19 cases in Arizona rose to 36,705 today from 32,918 Friday, and 1,194 have died from the virus, said the Arizona Department of Health.

In Maricopa County, there are 19,372 confirmed cases of COVID-19, 3,944 in Pima County, 2,636 in Navajo County, 1,373 in Coconino County, 1,568 in Pinal County, 374 in Yavapai County, 1,975 in Apache County, 3,265 in Yuma County, 618 in Mohave County, 221 in Cochise County, 988 in Santa Cruz County, 50 in Graham County, 222 in La Paz County, 87 in Gila County and 12 in Greenlee County.

Video: Gov. pauses re-opening of some businesses as COVID-19 cases rise 6-15-summary

People 20 to 44 years old had the largest number of confirmed COVID-19 cases at 16,636, followed by people 45 to 54 years old with 5,785 cases, then people 65 years and older with 5,541 cases, people from 55 to 64 years old with 4,846 cases and people under 20 years old with 3,864 cases, according to the Arizona Department of Health Services.

Thirty-eight percent of confirmed COVID-19 cases are in people of unknown race/ethnicity, 26% in Hispanic or Latino, 18% in White/Non-Hispanic, 11% Native American, 3% Black/Non-Hispanic and 1% Asian/ Pacific Islander and 3% Other/Non-Hispanic.

Video: Gov. pauses re-opening of some businesses as COVID-19 cases rise 6-15-ICU-bed-availability

Twenty-five percent of people who had confirmed COVID-19 cases had a chronic medical condition and 33% were high risk – 65 or more years old with one or more chronic medical condition. Fifty-three percent of people with confirmed cases of COVID-19 are female.

Video: Gov. pauses re-opening of some businesses as COVID-19 cases rise 6-15-Confirmed-COVID-Cases-by-day

Forty-five percent of COVID-19 deaths were in White/Non-Hispanic people, 20% Hispanic or Latino, 18% Native American, 12% in people of unknown race/ethnicity, 3% Black/Non-Hispanic and 1% Asian/ Pacific Islander and 2% Other/Non-Hispanic.

More men, 54%, than women, and more people 65 years old or older – 903 – have died from COVID-19 in Arizona.

Video: Gov. pauses re-opening of some businesses as COVID-19 cases rise 5-15-DEATHS

There were 449 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in congregate settings such as assisted living, long-term care facilities, prisons, rehab facilities, hospitals, shelters, workplace, dialysis clinics, private residential, hospice, childcare/daycare, college/university, outpatient clinics and religious facilities.

Video: Gov. pauses re-opening of some businesses as COVID-19 cases rise 6-15-Congregate-Cases

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled today that federal law protects LGBTQ workers from job discrimination.

The 6-3 opinion was written by Justice Neil Gorsuch, joined by Chief Justice John Roberts and the court’s four liberal justices said a provision of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 known as Title VII that bars job discrimination because of sex, amongst other reasons, includes bias against LGBTQ workers, The Associated Press reports.

“An employer who fires an individual for being homosexual or transgender fires that person for traits or actions it would not have questioned in members of a different sex. Sex plays a necessary and undisguisable role in the decision, exactly what Title VII forbids,” Justice Gorsuch wrote.

Monsoon season begins today and continues to the end of September.

Teachers want to be part of the decision-making process as schools create their re-opening plans, says Expect More Arizona.

Looking for ways to strengthen student engagement in online discussions? Here are some ideas.

A study released this week in Educational Researcher found teachers cover significantly less algebra material in those classes at predominately black schools than peers in majority white schools or schools with no racial majority.

Arizonans are protesting for the 19th day against racism and police brutality.

Help youth solve civic problems and help nonprofits responding to social challenges.

The economic fallout from COVID-19 has many students reconsidering their plans after high school. Some are considering a gap year.

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Updates from May 26 – June 12: Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high

Updates from May 20 – 25: AZ Dept. of Ed releases COVID-19 guidance to schools for summer programs, back to school

Updates from May 11 – 19: Arizonans consider workplace safety, what back to school will look like amid COVID-19

Updates from April 26 – May 10: Stores re-open, COVID-19 testing blitz resumes on Saturday

Updates from April 8 – 25You can get tested now if you think you’ve been exposed to COVID-19

Updates from March 12 – April 7Coronavirus response: Cases rise; AZ Day of Giving