Unofficial elections results complete - AZEdNews
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Unofficial elections results complete


Voters Drop Off Their Early Ballots At Peoria City Hall On Election Day Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2022. Photo By Lisa Irish/ AZEdNews

Upated 3:21 p.m. Monday, Nov. 21, 2022: All election results are complete statewide, and will remain unofficial until the votes are canvassed next week, counties certify results Nov. 28, and the state certifies election results Dec. 5.

An automatic recount of elections results for the close Superintendent of Public Instruction and Attorney Generals races will happen after Dec. 5 and will be presented to a judge who will share them.

According to unofficial results posted on the Arizona Secretary of State’s Elections Results page as of 2:45 p.m. Monday, there were 2,592,312 ballots cast out of 4,143,929 registered voters for a voter turnout of 62.56%.

Click here for Arizona Secretary of State’s Statewide Elections Results

Click here for Maricopa County Elections Results

Topic

Education elections

Updated 12:15 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022: Superintendent of Public Instruction Kathy Hoffman conceded the schools chief election this morning to Tom Horne.

Horne, a former Supt. of Public Instruction and attorney general, has a 9,000 vote lead with 20,000 more ballots remaining to be counted statewide.

Proposition 308, which would let undocumented students who attend an Arizona high school for two years and graduate receive in-state tuition at Arizona’s public universities, currently has 51.24% yes votes.

School bonds, overrides and more

Among bond elections as of now, voters approved a bond in Tempe Union High School District as well as Phoenix Elementary School District, Tempe Elementary School District, Washington Elementary School District, Fowler Elementary School District, and Union Elementary School District.

Voters are rejecting a bond in Agua Fria Union High School District, Higley Unified School District, Nadaburg Elementary School District, Queen Creek Unified School District, and Fountain Hills Unified School District.

In budget override elections so far, voters in Buckeye Union High School District approved continuing their budget override as did voters in Agua Fria Union High School District, Glendale Union High School District, Tempe Union High School District, Washington Elementary School District, Osborn Elementary School District, Wickenburg Unified School District, Union Elementary School District, Creighton Elementary School District, Murphy Elementary School District, Paradise Valley Unified School District, Litchfield Elementary School District, and Cartwright Elementary School District.

Voters also approved a budget increase question for Tempe Union High School District, Liberty Elementary School District, Madison Elementary School District, Scottsdale Unified School District, and Union Elementary School District.

Voters rejected a budget increase for Cave Creek Unified School District and Fountain Hills Unified School District.

So far, voters also have approved the sale, lease or exchange of property in Tolleson Union High School District and Phoenix Elementary School District.

Voters also approved Nadaburg Elementary School District joining West-MEC career and technical education district.

School Board elections

In Maricopa County, early results are in for school governing board elections.

In school governing board member elections as of now, Laura Metcalfe is leading for EVIT, Patty Kennedy and Natalie Evans Veidmark are leading in Glendale Union High School District, Signa R. Oliver and Stephanie Parra in Phoenix Union High School District, Amanda Steele and Andres A. Barraza in Tempe Union High School District, Amy L. Carney and Carine Werner in Scottsdale Unified School District, Elda Luna-Nájera and Devin Del Palacio in Tolleson Union High School District, Marcie Hutchinson and Rachel Walden in Mesa Unified School District, Tamillia N. Valenzuela and Kyle Clayton in Washington Elementary School District, Violeta M. Ramos and Leanne Greenberg in Osborn Elementary School District, Melissa Anne Ewing and Heather Kay Rooks in Peoria Unified School District.

Voters also elected Guadalupe M. Gonzales and Jennifer Ayala in Murphy Elementary School District, Bryan A. Parks and Mark A. Aguire in Liberty Elementary School District, Kevin Walsh and Nelson Trine in Kyrene Elementary School District, Gina Ragsdale and Danielle L. Cornell in Buckeye Elementary School District, Christine M. Thompson and Mitra Khazai in Madison Elementary School District, Chad Thompson and Jill Humpherys in Gilbert Unified School District, Francisca Montoya and Lisa M. Perez in Fowler Elementary School District, Linda Abegg and Jill M. Barragan in Laveen Elementary School District, Amanda Wade and Anna Van Hoek in Higley Unified School District, Amy E. Soucinek, Markus R. Ceniceros and Rachel Barnett in Littleton Elementary School District.

Voters elected Ashley Hodge and Megan Frankiewicz in Roosevelt Elementary School District, Christian Solorio Acuña and Mathew “Mat” Nevarez in Alhambra Elementary School District, Sandra Christensen, Tony Pantera, and Kerry L. Baker in Paradise Valley Unified School District, Ryan Owens and Kimberly Moran in Litchfield Elementary School District, Kurt D. Rohrs and Patti Serrano in Chandler Unified School District, Lydia Hernandez and Pedro Antonio Lopez in Cartwright Elementary School District, Jennifer Drake and Dawn Densmore in Dysart Unified School District, Daniel E. Blackson and Amy Marie Amaral in Saddle Mountain Unified School District, Scott Brown and Jackie L. Ulmer in Cave Creek Unified School District, Samantha Davis and James Knox in Queen Creek Unified School District, Stephanie N. Simacek and Paul Carver in Deer Valley Unified School District, Libby L. Settle, Lillian G. Acker and Madicyn Reid in Fountain Hills Unified School District.

Click here for Maricopa County Elections

Click here for Apache County Elections

Click here for Cochise County Elections

Click here for Coconino County Elections

Click here for Gila County Elections

Click here for Graham County Elections

Click here for Greenlee County Elections

Click here for La Paz County Elections

Click here for Mohave County Elections

Click here for Navajo County Elections

Click here for Pima County Elections

Click here for Pinal County Elections

Click here for Santa Cruz County Elections

Click here for Yavapai County Elections

Click here for Yuma County Elections

Updated Sunday, Nov. 20, 2022: Maricopa County Elections will release complete elections results on Monday, Nov. 21.

Updated 12:15 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 17, 2022: Superintendent of Public Instruction Kathy Hoffman conceded the schools chief election this morning to Tom Horne.

Horne, a former Supt. of Public Instruction and attorney general, has a 9,000 vote lead with 20,000 more ballots remaining to be counted statewide.

According to unofficial results posted on the Arizona Secretary of State’s Elections Results page as of 12:08 p.m. Thursday, there were 2,582,021 ballots cast out of 4,143,929 registered voters for a voter turnout of 62.31%.

Maricopa County Elections estimates the count is 99.5% complete with the results released today.

Click here for Arizona Secretary of State’s Statewide Elections Results

Click here for Maricopa County Elections Results

Proposition 308, which would let undocumented students who attend an Arizona high school for two years and graduate receive in-state tuition at Arizona’s public universities, currently has 51.23% yes votes.

School bonds, overrides and more

Among bond elections as of now, voters approved a bond in Tempe Union High School District as well as Phoenix Elementary School District, Tempe Elementary School District, Washington Elementary School District, Fowler Elementary School District, and Union Elementary School District.

Voters are rejecting a bond in Agua Fria Union High School District, Higley Unified School District, Nadaburg Elementary School District, Queen Creek Unified School District, and Fountain Hills Unified School District.

In budget override elections so far, voters in Buckeye Union High School District approved continuing their budget override as did voters in Agua Fria Union High School District, Glendale Union High School District, Tempe Union High School District, Washington Elementary School District, Osborn Elementary School District, Wickenburg Unified School District, Union Elementary School District, Creighton Elementary School District, Murphy Elementary School District, Paradise Valley Unified School District, Litchfield Elementary School District, and Cartwright Elementary School District.

Voters also approved a budget increase question for Tempe Union High School District, Liberty Elementary School District, Madison Elementary School District, Scottsdale Unified School District, and Union Elementary School District.

Voters rejected a budget increase for Cave Creek Unified School District and Fountain Hills Unified School District.

So far, voters also have approved the sale, lease or exchange of property in Tolleson Union High School District and Phoenix Elementary School District.

Voters also approved Nadaburg Elementary School District joining West-MEC career and technical education district.

School Board elections

In Maricopa County, early results are in for school governing board elections.

In school governing board member elections as of now, Laura Metcalfe is leading for EVIT, Patty Kennedy and Natalie Evans Veidmark are leading in Glendale Union High School District, Signa R. Oliver and Stephanie Parra, in Phoenix Union High School District, Amanda Steele and Andres A. Barraza in Tempe Union High School District, Amy L. Carney and Carine Werner in Scottsdale Unified School District, Elda Luna-Najera and Devin Del Palacio in Tolleson Union High School District, Marcie Hutchinson and Rachel Walden in Mesa Unified School District, Tamillia N. Valenzuela and Kyle Clayton in Washington Elementary School District, Violeta M. Ramos and Leanne Greenberg in Osborn Elementary School District, Melissa Anne Ewing and Heather Kay Rooks in Peoria Unified School District.

Voters also elected Guadalupe M. Gonzales and Jennifer Ayala in Murphy Elementary School District, Bryan A. Parks and Mark A. Aguire in Liberty Elementary School District, Kevin Walsh and Nelson Trine in Kyrene Elementary School District, Gina Ragsdale and Danielle L. Cornell in Buckeye Elementary School District, Christine M. Thompson and Mitra Khazai in Madison Elementary School District, Chad Thompson and Jill Humpherys in Gilbert Unified School District, Francisca Montoya and Lisa M. Perez in Fowler Elementary School District, Linda Abegg and Jill M. Barragan in Laveen Elementary School District, Amanda Wade and Anna Van Hoek in Higley Unified School District, Amy E. Soucinek, Markus R. Ceniceros and Rachel Barnett in Littleton Elementary School District.

Voters elected Ashley Hodge and Megan Frankiewicz in Roosevelt Elementary School District, Christian Solorio Acuna and Mathew “Mat” Nevarez in Alhambra Elementary School District, Tony Pantera, Sandra Christensen, and Kerry L. Baker in Paradise Valley Unified School District, Kimberly Moran and Ryan Owens in Litchfield Elementary School District, Patti Serrano and Kurt D. Rohrs in Chandler Unified School District, Lydia Hernandez and Pedro Antonio Lopez in Cartwright Elementary School District, Jennifer Drake and Dawn Densmore in Dysart Unified School District, Daniel E. Blackson and Amy Marie Amaral in Saddle Mountain Unified School District, Scott Brown and Jackie L. Ulmer in Cave Creek Unified School District, Samantha Davis and James Knox in Queen Creek Unified School District, Stephanie N. Simacek and Paul Carver in Deer Valley Unified School District, Libby L. Settle, Lillian G. Acker and Madicyn Reid in Fountain Hills Unified School District.

Click here for Maricopa County Elections

Click here for Apache County Elections

Click here for Cochise County Elections

Click here for Coconino County Elections

Click here for Gila County Elections

Click here for Graham County Elections

Click here for Greenlee County Elections

Click here for La Paz County Elections

Click here for Mohave County Elections

Click here for Navajo County Elections

Click here for Pima County Elections

Click here for Pinal County Elections

Click here for Santa Cruz County Elections

Click here for Yavapai County Elections

Click here for Yuma County Elections

Unofficial elections results complete Surprise-Voters-group-close-up-1024x605
Voters at Surprise City Hall to cast their ballots on Election Day Nov. 8, 2022. Photo by Lisa Irish/ AZEdNews

Updated 3:07 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2022: If your signature on your callot needs to be verified today at 5 p.m. is the last time to take care of that so that your ballot is counted.

To check on that go to Be Ballot Ready and click on the Check your Status button.

Elections staff in Maricopa County are doing a reconciliation of ballots to ensure only legal ballots are counted.

With all polling place precincts in as of 3:12 p.m. Wednesday, there were 2,571,728 ballots cast out of 4,143,929 registered voters for a voter turnout of 62.06%.

Maricopa County Elections estimates the count is 99.2% complete with the results released yesterday.

Click here for Arizona Secretary of State’s Statewide Elections Results

Click here for Maricopa County Elections Results

Education election results

With the latest results, Tom Horne remains ahead of incumbent Kathy Hoffman in the election for Superintendent of Public Instruction with a lead of 8,672 votes.

Proposition 308, which would let undocumented students who attend an Arizona high school for two years and graduate receive in-state tuition at Arizona’s public universities, currently has 51.23% yes votes.

School bonds, overrides and more

Among bond elections as of now, voters approved a bond in Tempe Union High School District as well as Phoenix Elementary School District, Tempe Elementary School District, Washington Elementary School District, Fowler Elementary School District, and Union Elementary School District.

Voters are rejecting a bond in Agua Fria Union High School District, Higley Unified School District, Nadaburg Elementary School District, Queen Creek Unified School District, and Fountain Hills Unified School District.

In budget override elections so far, voters in Buckeye Union High School District approved continuing their budget override as did voters in Agua Fria Union High School District, Glendale Union High School District, Tempe Union High School District, Washington Elementary School District, Osborn Elementary School District, Wickenburg Unified School District, Union Elementary School District, Creighton Elementary School District, Murphy Elementary School District, Paradise Valley Unified School District, Litchfield Elementary School District, and Cartwright Elementary School District.

Voters also approved a budget increase question for Tempe Union High School District, Liberty Elementary School District, Madison Elementary School District, and Scottsdale Unified School District, and Union Elementary School District.

Voters rejected a budget increase for Cave Creek Unified School District and Fountain Hills Unified School District.

So far, voters also have approved the sale, lease or exchange of property in Tolleson Union High School District and Phoenix Elementary School District,

Voters also approved Nadaburg Elementary School District joining West-MEC career and technical education district.

School Board elections

In Maricopa County, early results are in for school governing board elections.

In school governing board member elections as of now, Laura Metcalfe is leading for EVIT, Patty Kennedy and Natalie Evans Veidmark are leading in Glendale Union High School District, Signa R. Oliver and Stephanie Parra, in Phoenix Union High School District, Amanda Steele and Andres A. Barraza in Tempe Union High School District, Amy L. Carney and Carine Werner in Scottsdale Unified School District, Elda Luna-Najera and Devin Del Palacio in Tolleson Union High School District, Marcie Hutchinson and Rachel Walden in Mesa Unified School District, Tamillia N. Valenzuela and Kyle Clayton in Washington Elementary School District, Violeta M. Ramos and Leanne Greenberg in Osborn Elementary School District, Melissa Anne Ewing and Heather Kay Rooks in Peoria Unified School District.

Voters also elected Guadalupe M. Gonzales and Jennifer Ayala in Murphy Elementary School District, Bryan A. Parks and Mark A. Aguire in Liberty Elementary School District, Kevin Walsh and Nelson Trine in Kyrene Elementary School District, Gina Ragsdale and Danielle L. Cornell in Buckeye Elementary School District, Christine M. Thompson and Mitra Khazai in Madison Elementary School District, Chad Thompson and Jill Humpherys in Gilbert Unified School District, Francisca Montoya and Lisa M. Perez in Fowler Elementary School District, Linda Abegg and Jill M. Barragan in Laveen Elementary School District, Amanda Wade and Anna Van Hoek in Higley Unified School District, Amy E. Soucinek, Markus R. Ceniceros and Rachel Barnett in Littleton Elementary School District, Ashley Hodge and Megan Frankiewicz in Roosevelt Elementary School District, Christian Solorio Acuna and Mathew “Mat” Nevarez in Alhambra Elementary School District, Tony Pantera, Sandra Christensen, and Kerry L. Baker in Paradise Valley Unified School District, Kimberly Moran and Ryan Owens in Litchfield Elementary School District, Patti Serrano and Kurt D. Rohrs in Chandler Unified School District, Lydia Hernandez and Pedro Antonio Lopez in Cartwright Elementary School District, Jennifer Drake and Dawn Densmore in Dysart Unified School District, Daniel E. Blackson and Amy Marie Amaral in Saddle Mountain Unified School District, Scott Brown and Jackie L. Ulmer in Cave Creek Unified School District, Samantha Davis and James Knox in Queen Creek Unified School District, Stephanie N. Simacek and Paul Carver in Deer Valley Unified School District, Libby L. Settle, Lillian G. Acker and Madicyn Reid in Fountain Hills Unified School District.

Click here for Maricopa County Elections

Click here for Apache County Elections

Click here for Cochise County Elections

Click here for Coconino County Elections

Click here for Gila County Elections

Click here for Graham County Elections

Click here for Greenlee County Elections

Click here for La Paz County Elections

Click here for Mohave County Elections

Click here for Navajo County Elections

Click here for Pima County Elections

Click here for Pinal County Elections

Click here for Santa Cruz County Elections

Click here for Yavapai County Elections

Click here for Yuma County Elections results

Unofficial elections results complete El-Mirage-voters-close-up-1024x513
Voters going to El Mirage City Hall to cast their early ballots on Election Day Nov. 8, 2022. Photo by Lisa Irish/ AZEdNews

Updated 7:47 p.m. to 8:41 p.m. Monday, Nov. 14: The latest batch of election results for Maricopa County were released this evening, and Maricopa County Elections estimates the count is nearly complete.

Here’s a look at election results breakdown by ABC 15 Arizona’s Data Guru Garrett Archer, including the estimated number of ballots remaining to be counted.

With 100% of all polling place precincts in Arizona reporting results at 1:46 p.m. Monday, there were 2,542,668 ballots cast out of 4,143,929 registered voters for a voter turnout of 61.36%.

Click here for Arizona Secretary of State’s Statewide Elections Results

Click here for Maricopa County Elections Results

After the latest ballot drop, Katie Hobbs lead over Kari Lake was 20,481 votes, and The Associated Press projected Hobbs at the winner in the election for Governor.

Education election results

With the latest results, Tom Horne remains ahead of incumbent Kathy Hoffman in the election for Superintendent of Public Instruction with a lead of 5,294 votes.

Proposition 308, which would let undocumented students who attend an Arizona high school for two years and graduate receive in-state tuition at Arizona’s public universities, currently has 51.28% yes votes.

School bonds, overrides and more

Among bond elections as of now, voters approved a bond in Tempe Union High School District as well as Phoenix Elementary School District, Tempe Elementary School District, Washington Elementary School District, Fowler Elementary School District, and Union Elementary School District.

Voters are rejecting a bond in Agua Fria Union High School District, Higley Unified School District, Union Elementary School District, Nadaburg Elementary School District, Queen Creek Unified School District, and Fountain Hills Unified School District.

In budget override elections so far, voters in Buckeye Union High School District approved continuing their budget override as did voters in Agua Fria Union High School District, Glendale Union High School District, Tempe Union High School District, Washington Elementary School District, Osborn Elementary School District, Wickenburg Unified School District, Union Elementary School District, Creighton Elementary School District, Murphy Elementary School District, Paradise Valley Unified School District, Litchfield Elementary School District, and Cartwright Elementary School District.

Voters also approved a budget increase question for Tempe Union High School District, Liberty Elementary School District, Madison Elementary School District, and Scottsdale Unified School District, and Union Elementary School District.

Voters rejected a budget increase for Cave Creek Unified School District and Fountain Hills Unified School District.

So far, voters also have approved the sale, lease or exchange of property in Tolleson Union High School District and Phoenix Elementary School District,

Voters also approved Nadaburg Elementary School District joining West-MEC career and technical education district.

School Board elections

In Maricopa County, early results are in for school governing board elections.

In school governing board member elections as of now, Laura Metcalfe is leading for EVIT, Patty Kennedy and Natalie Evans Veidmark are leading in Glendale Union High School District, Signa R. Oliver and Stephanie Parra, in Phoenix Union High School District, Amanda Steele and Andres A. Barraza in Tempe Union High School District, Carine Werner and Amy L. Carney in Scottsdale Unified School District, Elda Luna-Najera and Devin Del Palacio in Tolleson Union High School District, Marcie Hutchinson and Rachel Walden in Mesa Unified School District, Tamillia N. Valenzuela and Kyle Clayton in Washington Elementary School District, Leanne Greenberg and Violeta M. Ramos in Osborn Elementary School District, Melissa Anne Ewing and Heather Kay Rooks in Peoria Unified School District.

Voters also elected Guadalupe M. Gonzales and Jennifer Ayala in Murphy Elementary School District, Bryan A. Parks and Mark A. Aguire in Liberty Elementary School District, Kevin Walsh and Nelson Trine in Kyrene Elementary School District, Gina Ragsdale and Danielle L. Cornell in Buckeye Elementary School District, Christine M. Thompson and Mitra Khazai in Madison Elementary School District, Jill Humpherys and Chad Thompson in Gilbert Unified School District, Francisca Montoya and Lisa M. Perez in Fowler Elementary School District, Jill M. Barragan and Linda Abegg in Laveen Elementary School District, Amanda Wade and Anna Van Hoek in Higley Unified School District, Amy E. Soucinek, Markus R. Ceniceros and Rachel Barnett in Littleton Elementary School District, Ashley Hodge and Megan Frankiewicz in Roosevelt Elementary School District, Christian Solorio Acuna and Mathew “Mat” Nevarez in Alhambra Elementary School District, Tony Pantera, Sandra Christensen, and Kerry L. Baker in Paradise Valley Unified School District, Kimberly Moran and Ryan Owens in Litchfield Elementary School District, Patti Serrano and Kurt D. Rohrs in Chandler Unified School District, Lydia Hernandez and Pedro Antonio Lopez in Cartwright Elementary School District, Jennifer Drake and Dawn Densmore in Dysart Unified School District, Daniel E. Blackson and Amy Marie Amaral in Saddle Mountain Unified School District, Jackie L. Ulmer and Scott Brown in Cave Creek Unified School District, Samantha Davis and James Knox in Queen Creek Unified School District, Stephanie N. Simacek and Paul Carver in Deer Valley Unified School District, Libby L. Settle, Lillian G. Acker and Madicyn Reid in Fountain Hills Unified School District.

Click here for Maricopa County Elections

Click here for Apache County Elections

Click here for Cochise County Elections

Click here for Coconino County Elections

Click here for Gila County Elections

Click here for Graham County Elections

Click here for Greenlee County Elections

Click here for La Paz County Elections

Click here for Mohave County Elections

Click here for Navajo County Elections

Click here for Pima County Elections

Click here for Pinal County Elections

Click here for Santa Cruz County Elections

Click here for Yavapai County Elections

Click here for Yuma County Elections results

Updated 1:46 p.m. to 2:31 p.m. Monday, Nov. 14: More statewide election results were released today, and Maricopa County will release another batch of ballot results after 6 p.m.

Maricopa County Elections shared where ballots from each election are stored.

With 100% of all polling place precincts in Arizona reporting results at 1:46 p.m. Monday, there were 2,431,418 ballots cast out of 4,143,929 registered voters for a voter turnout of 58.67%.

Click here for Arizona Secretary of State’s Statewide Elections Results

Click here for Maricopa County Elections Results

Republicans hold a one-seat advantage in each chamber of the Arizona Legislature according to the most recent elections results.

A chart in an Arizona Mirror article showed why high-profile elections results are closer in recent years.

The election for Arizona Governor remains too close to call.

Education election results

With the latest results, Tom Horne has pulled ahead of incumbent Kathy Hoffman in the election for Superintendent of Public Instruction, but since the lead is by a narrow margin, the election remains too close to call.

Proposition 308, which would let undocumented students who attend an Arizona high school for two years and graduate receive in-state tuition at Arizona’s public universities, currently has 51.32% yes votes.

School bonds, overrides and more

Among bond elections as of now, voters approved a bond in Tempe Union High School District as well as Phoenix Elementary School District, Tempe Elementary School District, Washington Elementary School District, Fowler Elementary School District, and Union Elementary School District.

Voters are rejecting a bond in Agua Fria Union High School District, Higley Unified School District, Union Elementary School District, Nadaburg Elementary School District, Queen Creek Unified School District, and Fountain Hills Unified School District.

In budget override elections so far, voters in Buckeye Union High School District approved continuing their budget override as did voters in Agua Fria Union High School District, Glendale Union High School District, Tempe Union High School District, Washington Elementary School District, Osborn Elementary School District, Wickenburg Unified School District, Union Elementary School District, Creighton Elementary School District, Murphy Elementary School District, Paradise Valley Unified School District, Litchfield Elementary School District, and Cartwright Elementary School District.

Voters also approved a budget increase question for Tempe Union High School District, Liberty Elementary School District, Madison Elementary School District, and Scottsdale Unified School District, and Union Elementary School District.

Voters rejected a budget increase for Cave Creek Unified School District and Fountain Hills Unified School District.

So far, voters also have approved the sale, lease or exchange of property in Tolleson Union High School District and Phoenix Elementary School District,

Voters also approved Nadaburg Elementary School District joining West-MEC career and technical education district.

School Board elections

In Maricopa County, early results are in for school governing board elections.

In school governing board member elections as of now, Laura Metcalfe is leading for EVIT, Patty Kennedy and Natalie Evans Veidmark are leading in Glendale Union High School District, Signa R. Oliver and Stephanie Parra, in Phoenix Union High School District, Amanda Steele and Andres A. Barraza in Tempe Union High School District, Carine Werner and Amy L. Carney in Scottsdale Unified School District, Elda Luna-Najera and Devin Del Palacio in Tolleson Union High School District, Marcie Hutchinson and Rachel Walden in Mesa Unified School District, Tamillia N. Valenzuela and Kyle Clayton in Washington Elementary School District, Leanne Greenberg and Violeta M. Ramos in Osborn Elementary School District, Melissa Anne Ewing and Heather Kay Rooks in Peoria Unified School District.

Voters also elected Guadalupe M. Gonzales and Jennifer Ayala in Murphy Elementary School District, Bryan A. Parks and Mark A. Aguire in Liberty Elementary School District, Kevin Walsh and Nelson Trine in Kyrene Elementary School District, Gina Ragsdale and Danielle L. Cornell in Buckeye Elementary School District, Christine M. Thompson and Mitra Khazai in Madison Elementary School District, Jill Humpherys and Chad Thompson in Gilbert Unified School District, Francisca Montoya and Lisa M. Perez in Fowler Elementary School District, Jill M. Barragan and Linda Abegg in Laveen Elementary School District, Amanda Wade and Anna Van Hoek in Higley Unified School District, Amy E. Soucinek, Markus R. Ceniceros and Rachel Barnett in Littleton Elementary School District, Ashley Hodge and Megan Frankiewicz in Roosevelt Elementary School District, Christian Solorio Acuna and Mathew “Mat” Nevarez in Alhambra Elementary School District, Tony Pantera, Sandra Christensen, and Kerry L. Baker in Paradise Valley Unified School District, Kimberly Moran and Ryan Owens in Litchfield Elementary School District, Patti Serrano and Kurt D. Rohrs in Chandler Unified School District, Lydia Hernandez and Pedro Antonio Lopez in Cartwright Elementary School District, Jennifer Drake and Dawn Densmore in Dysart Unified School District, Daniel E. Blackson and Amy Marie Amaral in Saddle Mountain Unified School District, Jackie L. Ulmer and Scott Brown in Cave Creek Unified School District, Samantha Davis and James Knox in Queen Creek Unified School District, Stephanie N. Simacek and Paul Carver in Deer Valley Unified School District, Libby L. Settle, Lillian G. Acker and Madicyn Reid in Fountain Hills Unified School District.

Click here for Maricopa County Elections

Click here for Apache County Elections

Click here for Cochise County Elections

Click here for Coconino County Elections

Click here for Gila County Elections

Click here for Graham County Elections

Click here for Greenlee County Elections

Click here for La Paz County Elections

Click here for Mohave County Elections

Click here for Navajo County Elections

Click here for Pima County Elections

Click here for Pinal County Elections

Click here for Santa Cruz County Elections

Click here for Yavapai County Elections

Click here for Yuma County Elections results

Updated 10:06 to 11:26 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 13: More election results were released this evening, and more are expected to be released tomorrow.

With 100% of all polling place precincts in Arizona reporting results at 6:18 p.m. Sunday, there were 2,427,999 ballots cast out of 4,143,929 registered voters for a voter turnout of 58.59%.

Early ballots voters dropped off at polling places around the state on Election Day are being signature verified and counted.

Click here for Arizona Secretary of State’s Statewide Elections Results

Click here for Maricopa County Elections Results

Check out ABC 15 Arizona Data Guru Garrett Archer’s analysis of this batch of ballots released this evening.

Here is an idea of the outstanding ballots left after this evening’s ballot drop.

What the breakdown of the ballots left to count looks like.

A quick look at the breakdown of people deciding not to vote in certain elections by office and county and what that means for the outcomes in especially close races.

Take a look at the formula for a recount.

Kari Lake narrowed Katie Hobbs lead in the race for Governor with the ballots released tonight.

While Katie Hobbs campaign manager sent out this message, The Associated Press says the race for governor remains to close to call.

Sen. Martin Quezada conceded the election for Treasurer to incumbent Kimberly Yee.

Education election results

With the latest results, incumbent Kathy Hoffman and Tom Horne are nearly tied for Superintendent of Public Instruction, and the election remains too close to call.

Proposition 308, which would let undocumented students who attend an Arizona high school for two years and graduate receive in-state tuition at Arizona’s public universities, currently has 51.34% yes votes.

School bonds, overrides and more

Among bond elections as of now, voters approved a bond in Tempe Union High School District as well as Phoenix Elementary School District, Tempe Elementary School District, Washington Elementary School District, Fowler Elementary School District, and Union Elementary School District.

Voters are rejecting a bond in Agua Fria Union High School District, Higley Unified School District, Union Elementary School District, Nadaburg Elementary School District, Queen Creek Unified School District, and Fountain Hills Unified School District.

In budget override elections so far, voters in Buckeye Union High School District approved continuing their budget override as did voters in Agua Fria Union High School District, Glendale Union High School District, Tempe Union High School District, Washington Elementary School District, Osborn Elementary School District, Wickenburg Unified School District, Union Elementary School District, Creighton Elementary School District, Murphy Elementary School District, Paradise Valley Unified School District, Litchfield Elementary School District, and Cartwright Elementary School District.

Voters also approved a budget increase question for Tempe Union High School District, Liberty Elementary School District, Madison Elementary School District, and Scottsdale Unified School District, and Union Elementary School District.

Voters rejected a budget increase for Cave Creek Unified School District and Fountain Hills Unified School District.

So far, voters also have approved the sale, lease or exchange of property in Tolleson Union High School District and Phoenix Elementary School District,

Voters also approved Nadaburg Elementary School District joining West-MEC career and technical education district.

School Board elections

In Maricopa County, early results are in for school governing board elections.

In school governing board member elections as of now, Laura Metcalfe is leading for EVIT, Patty Kennedy and Natalie Evans Veidmark are leading in Glendale Union High School District, Signa R. Oliver and Stephanie Parra, in Phoenix Union High School District, Amanda Steele and Andres A. Barraza in Tempe Union High School District, Carine Werner and Amy L. Carney in Scottsdale Unified School District, Elda Luna-Najera and Devin Del Palacio in Tolleson Union High School District, Marcie Hutchinson and Rachel Walden in Mesa Unified School District, Tamillia N. Valenzuela and Kyle Clayton in Washington Elementary School District, Leanne Greenberg and Violeta M. Ramos in Osborn Elementary School District, Melissa Anne Ewing and Heather Kay Rooks in Peoria Unified School District.

Voters also elected Guadalupe M. Gonzales and Jennifer Ayala in Murphy Elementary School District, Bryan A. Parks and Mark A. Aguire in Liberty Elementary School District, Kevin Walsh and Nelson Trine in Kyrene Elementary School District, Gina Ragsdale and Danielle L. Cornell in Buckeye Elementary School District, Christine M. Thompson and Mitra Khazai in Madison Elementary School District, Jill Humpherys and Chad Thompson in Gilbert Unified School District, Francisca Montoya and Lisa M. Perez in Fowler Elementary School District, Jill M. Barragan and Linda Abegg in Laveen Elementary School District, Amanda Wade and Anna Van Hoek in Higley Unified School District, Amy E. Soucinek, Markus R. Ceniceros and Rachel Barnett in Littleton Elementary School District, Ashley Hodge and Megan Frankiewicz in Roosevelt Elementary School District, Christian Solorio Acuna and Mathew “Mat” Nevarez in Alhambra Elementary School District, Tony Pantera, Sandra Christensen, and Kerry L. Baker in Paradise Valley Unified School District, Kimberly Moran and Ryan Owens in Litchfield Elementary School District, Patti Serrano and Kurt D. Rohrs in Chandler Unified School District, Lydia Hernandez and Pedro Antonio Lopez in Cartwright Elementary School District, Jennifer Drake and Dawn Densmore in Dysart Unified School District, Daniel E. Blackson and Amy Marie Amaral in Saddle Mountain Unified School District, Jackie L. Ulmer and Scott Brown in Cave Creek Unified School District, Samantha Davis and James Knox in Queen Creek Unified School District, Stephanie N. Simacek and Paul Carver in Deer Valley Unified School District, Libby L. Settle, Lillian G. Acker and Madicyn Reid in Fountain Hills Unified School District.

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Updated 4:25 a.m. to 7:19 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 12: Election results continued to be released as counties tabulate early ballots dropped off at polling places on Election Day and provisional ballots.

Elections workers in Maricopa County and other Arizona counties continued to count ballots on Veterans Day.

Take a look at ABC 15 Arizona’s data guru Garrett Archer‘s analysis of the rmost recent ballot drops this evening in Maricopa County.

With 100% of all polling place precincts in Arizona reporting results at 4:25 a.m. Saturday, there were 2,196,537 ballots cast out of 4,143,929 registered voters for a voter turnout of 53.01%. All the early ballots voters dropped off at polling places around the state on Election Day are being signature verified and counted now.

Click here for Arizona Secretary of State’s Statewide Elections Results

Click here for Maricopa County Elections Results

Early results favored Democratic candidates. Some of those leads have narrowed as more results have been released, while others reversed.

See what HighGround’s Paul Bentz said after the ballot drops on Friday night.

The Associated Press called several races after more election results were released Friday night.

Several key races remain too close to call.

Maricopa County Board of Supervisors Chairman Bill Gates provided this update on ballot tabulation and the hand count during a press conference on Veterans Day, Nov. 11, 2022.

“Veterans Day is a holiday in Maricopa County, but obviously we continue to work here,” Gates said, noting that several veterans are involved in the vote counting process here and elections workers paused for a moment to recognize all veterans who are a part of this.

“In the 8 o’clock hour, we will have another vote drop. Somewhere around 80,000 votes to be reported again just like last night,” Gates said. “When you figure that in it will bring us just below 300,000 ballots that will be left to tabulate.”

A “decent amount” of the 17,000 in person Election Day votes in drawer 3, the remainder of the early votes from before Election Day and some of the early ballots dropped off on Election Day will be included in the 8 p.m. vote drop, Gates said.

“This will be the first report that includes the early ballots that were dropped off on Election Day,” Gates said.

The hand count audit starts Saturday, Gates said.

“The hand count audit is mandated by law. There’s been a lot of discussion about that recently, especially in some of the other counties around Arizona,” Gates said. “This is a very important part of the process.”

“The hand count audit allows us to ensure that the machines are operating correctly,” Gates said. “This will be a statistically significant amount of ballots that will be involved and there’s two parts of it.”

The batches of early ballots to be audited have been selected over the past few weeks by the political parties, and there was a drawing on Wednesday to randomly select the five vote centers, all of which ended up being vote centers in the West Valley, and selected races – governor, state representative, U.S. congress and Prop. 129 – will be examined by three person boards with representatives from each political party, Gates said.

“For people who have any concerns about what’s going on here today, we have people everyday throughout this process Republicans and Democrats who are participating in it, whether they’re actually observers that have been appointed by the county chairs or if they are folks who are serving as our poll workers or if they’re involved in one of the bipartisan boards, we have Republicans and Democrats working together,” Gates said.

“We know that this is an exciting time. People are very anxious to get the results. These people are committed to moving this process through, but while they’re doing it, they might be making a new friend, meeting someone from across the aisle, which I think we need a little bit more of in this country right now,” Gates said.

When asked about how some candidates and news media keep focusing on how long it’s taking to count all the votes, Gates reminded reporters that elections workers are following laws created by the Arizona Legislature and that he hasn’t heard any complaints from state legislators about it because they know they process they approved.

Gates said “To see national networks out there and their hosts saying, not being truthful about why it’s taking this period of time, that’s frustrating to these people back here” as he pointed to elections workers behind him “who are doing and incredible job working through Veterans Day weekend and then to have that spread out there nationally to have them raise questions. You know, yeah, I’m going to stand up for my state. I am going to stand up for my state. Maybe not everyone here is, but I am. We’re doing things the right way. And I appreciate that you’re all here, but we’re not doing anything wrong at all, and that someone from here would suggest that we are doing something wrong that’s frustrating.”

Education election results

With the latest results, incumbent Kathy Hoffman has the lead for Superintendent of Public Instruction, but the election remains too close to call.

Proposition 308, which would let undocumented students who attend an Arizona high school for two years and graduate receive in-state tuition at Arizona’s public universities, currently has 50.84% yes votes.

School bonds, overrides and more

Among bond elections as of now, voters approved a bond in Tempe Union High School District as well as Phoenix Elementary School District, Tempe Elementary School District, Washington Elementary School District, Fowler Elementary School District, and Union Elementary School District.

Voters are rejecting a bond in Agua Fria Union High School District, Higley Unified School District, Union Elementary School District, Nadaburg Elementary School District, Queen Creek Unified School District, and Fountain Hills Unified School District.

In budget override elections so far, voters in Buckeye Union High School District approved continuing their budget override as did voters in Agua Fria Union High School District, Glendale Union High School District, Tempe Union High School District, Washington Elementary School District, Osborn Elementary School District, Wickenburg Unified School District, Union Elementary School District, Creighton Elementary School District, Murphy Elementary School District, Paradise Valley Unified School District, Litchfield Elementary School District, and Cartwright Elementary School District.

Voters also approved a budget increase question for Tempe Union High School District, Liberty Elementary School District, Madison Elementary School District, and Scottsdale Unified School District, and Union Elementary School District.

Voters rejected a budget increase for Cave Creek Unified School District and Fountain Hills Unified School District.

So far, voters also have approved the sale, lease or exchange of property in Tolleson Union High School District and Phoenix Elementary School District,

Voters also approved Nadaburg Elementary School District joining West-MEC career and technical education district.

School Board elections

In Maricopa County, early results are in for school governing board elections.

In school governing board member elections as of now, Laura Metcalfe is leading for EVIT, Patty Kennedy and Natalie Evans Veidmark are leading in Glendale Union High School District, Signa R. Oliver and Stephanie Parra, in Phoenix Union High School District, Amanda Steele and Andres A. Barraza in Tempe Union High School District, Robb Vaules and Amy L. Carney in Scottsdale Unified School District, Elda Luna-Najera and Devin Del Palacion in Tolleson Union High School District, Marcie Hutchinson and Rachel Walden in Mesa Unified School District, Tamillia N. Valenzuela and Kyle Clayton in Washington Elementary School District, Leanne Greenberg and Violeta M. Ramos in Osborn Elementary School District, Melissa Anne Ewing and Heather Kay Rooks in Peoria Unified School District.

Voters also elected Guadalupe M. Gonzales and Jennifer Ayala in Murphy Elementary School District, Bryan A. Parks and Mark A. Aguire in Liberty Elementary School District, Kevin Walsh and Nelson Trine in Kyrene Elementary School District, Gina Ragsdale and Danielle L. Cornell in Buckeye Elementary School District, Christine M. Thompson and Mitra Khazai in Madison Elementary School District, Jill Humpherys and Chad Thompson in Gilbert Unified School District, Francisca Montoya and Lisa M. Perez in Fowler Elementary School District, Jill M. Barragan and Linda Abegg in Laveen Elementary School District, Amanda Wade and Anna Van Hoek in Higley Unified School District, Amy E. Soucinek, Markus R. Ceniceros and Rachel Barnett in Littleton Elementary School District, Ashley Hodge and Megan Frankiewicz in Roosevelt Elementary School District, Christian Solorio Acuna and Mathew “Mat” Nevarez in Alhambra Elementary School District, Tony Pantera, Sandra Christensen, and Kerry L. Baker in Paradise Valley Unified School District, Kimberly Moran and Ryan Owens in Litchfield Elementary School District, Patti Serrano and Kurt D. Rohrs in Chandler Unified School District, Lydia Hernandez and Pedro Antonio Lopez in Cartwright Elementary School District, Jennifer Drake and Dawn Densmore in Dysart Unified School District, Daniel E. Blackson and Amy Marie Amaral in Saddle Mountain Unified School District, Jackie L. Ulmer and Scott Brown in Cave Creek Unified School District, Samantha Davis and James Knox in Queen Creek Unified School District, Stephanie N. Simacek and Paul Carver in Deer Valley Unified School District, Libby L. Settle, Lillian G. Acker and Madicyn Reid in Fountain Hills Unified School District.

Click here for Maricopa County Elections

Click here for Apache County Elections

Click here for Cochise County Elections

In Cochise County, Willcox Unified School District asks voters to renew a bond, while Benson Unified School District seeks a continuation of an existing 13% budget override.

Click here for Coconino County Elections

This year, Flagstaff Unified School District in Coconino County is asking voters to continue an existing 15% budget override approved by voters in 2018 for seven years.

If voters approve to continue Flagstaff Unified’s existing budget override, then it would maintain all current student programs, current class sizes, art, music and physical education in elementary schools, extracurriculars, provide full-day kindergarten – the state currently funds ½ day,  gifted education, Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, and STEM programs and ensure compliance with state mandates, according to the information pamphlet.

Click here for Gila County Elections

Click here for Graham County Elections

Click here for Greenlee County Elections

Click here for La Paz County Elections

Click here for Mohave County Elections

Click here for Navajo County Elections

Click here for Pima County Elections

In Pima County, Catalina Foothills School District seeks a continuation of its existing override as well as a district additional assistance override and a $38.5 million bond. Marana Unified School District has a $90 million bond measure on the ballot. Sahuarita Unified School District No. 30 has a continuation of its override on the ballot along with a district additional assistance override. Tanque Verde Unified School District No. 13 asks vote

Click here for Pinal County Elections

On the ballot in Pinal County, Casa Grande Elementary School District No. 4 seeks to continue an existing 10% maintenance and operation budget override (Proposition 471), Casa Grande Union High School District No. 82 asks voters to continue an existing 10% maintenance and operation budget override (Prop 472), Santa Cruz Valley Union High School District No. 840 has a new 15% maintenance and operation budget override (Prop 473) on the ballot, and Stanfield Elementary School District No. 24 has a ballot measure for a new 10% maintenance and operation budget override (Prop 474).

Click here for Santa Cruz County Elections

Click here for Yavapai County Elections

Click here for Yuma

Unofficial elections results complete Voters-at-Surprise-Town-Hall-Close-up-1024x611
Voters entering Surprise City Hall to cast their votes on Election Day Nov. 8, 2022. Photo by Lisa Irish/ AZEdNews

Updated 6:28 a.m. to 6:22 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 10, 2022: Election results will continue to be released throughout the day and evening as counties continue to count the early ballots dropped off at polling places on or near Election Day.

With 100% of all polling place precincts in Arizona reporting results at 6:23 p.m. Thursday, there were 1,971,337 ballots cast out of 4,143,929 registered voters for a voter turnout of 47.57%. All the early ballots voters dropped off at polling places around the state on Election Day are being signature verified and counted now.

Click here for Arizona Secretary of State’s Statewide Elections Results

Click here for Maricopa County Elections Results

Early results favored Democratic candidates. Some of those leads have narrowed as more results have been released, while others reversed.

The Associated Press called several races after more election results were released Friday night.

Several key races remain too close to call.

“We received over 900,000 early ballots. Those were signature verified. Those were processed. Those were sent forward to tabulation. Those were included in the results…Many were included in the initial results,” said Maricopa County Recorder Stephen Richer to reporters Wednesday morning during a news conference.

On Wednesday, there were more than 400,000 early ballots left to verify and count, said Maricopa County Supervisor Bill Gates. Progress is being made on that and some of those results were released yesterday.

“It’s likely that by this weekend, we’ll have probably about 95% of the ballots countes to the majority of those will get through by this weekend,” said Maricopa County Elections Communications Director Megan Gilbertson. “It usually takes the county between 10 and even up to 15 days to count all of the early ballots, all of the ballots in the election and to kind of close all of that out.”

“We are now from yesterday’s Election Day operation shifting back to that early ballot processing,” Richer said.

Richer said elections received about 86,000 early ballots of Friday, Saturday and Sunday before Election Day, and elections workers are scanning each bar code on the ballot that links to a registered voter, “ensure that is a valid registered voter, that voter hasn’t cast a ballot previously, and that we capture an image of that signature affidavit, then we load that into our database and we review the signature. Once the signature is matched, we send it forward to a bi-partisan ballot processing team.”

That team takes the ballot out of the green affidavit envelope, makes sure that the ballot isn’t damaged, torn, have red ink on it, or coffee on it or anything that would inhibit it from being tabulated then they’re sent ahead to the board for tabulation, Richer said.

AZFamily 3 TV and CBS 5 News video LIVE: Maricopa County provides Wednesday morning update

Richer said there were a record number of early ballots dropped off at polling places on Election Day – about 275,000 – and those ballots are going through the process described above.

“This number is immense, and it’s probably a conversation Arizona needs to have in terms of public policy, because this is a number that keeps on growing. In many ways it’s wonderful. Arizonans appreciate the ease of the voting process and you can just take your early ballot and drop it off on Election Day, but it does inhibit us from having a higher percentage of returns available within the first 24 to 48 hours,” Richer said.

In comparison, there were 175,000 early ballots dropped off on Election Day in the 2020 election, Richer said.

“We understand that the people of Arizona are very anxious to get results, but again pursuant to state law, as Stephen just talked about, it’s going to take a while,” said Maricopa County Supervisor Bill Gates. “Again today, we’re asking for their patience, but we also want to give people a good idea of what is happening and what will be happening in the days ahead.”

There are already 1.1 million to 1.2 million votes that have been reported, Gates said.

Last night, the hand count audit of the vote began to ensure the accuracy of the 2022 General Elections results.

Early results favored Democratic candidates. Some of those leads have narrowed as more results have been released, while others reversed, but several key races remain too close to call.

Hear what Stan Barnes said about elections results on KTAR 92.3 FM this morning.

Education election results

The Superintendent of Public Instruction election is now too close to call.

Proposition 308, which would let undocumented students who attend an Arizona high school for two years and graduate receive in-state tuition at Arizona’s public universities, currently has 50.84% yes votes.

School bonds, overrides and more

Among bond elections as of now, voters approved a bond in Tempe Union High School District as well as Phoenix Elementary School District, Tempe Elementary School District, Washington Elementary School District, Fowler Elementary School District, and Union Elementary School District.

Voters are rejecting a bond in Agua Fria Union High School District, Higley Unified School District, Union Elementary School District, Nadaburg Elementary School District, Queen Creek Unified School District, and Fountain Hills Unified School District.

In budget override elections so far, voters in Buckeye Union High School District approved continuing their budget override as did voters in Agua Fria Union High School District, Glendale Union High School District, Tempe Union High School District, Washington Elementary School District, Osborn Elementary School District, Wickenburg Unified School District, Union Elementary School District, Creighton Elementary School District, Murphy Elementary School District, Paradise Valley Unified School District, Litchfield Elementary School District, and Cartwright Elementary School District.

Voters also approved a budget increase question for Tempe Union High School District, Liberty Elementary School District, Madison Elementary School District, and Scottsdale Unified School District, and Union Elementary School District.

Voters rejected a budget increase for Cave Creek Unified School District and Fountain Hills Unified School District.

So far, voters also have approved the sale, lease or exchange of property in Tolleson Union High School District and Phoenix Elementary School District,

Voters also approved Nadaburg Elementary School District joining West-MEC career and technical education district.

School Board elections

In Maricopa County, early results are in for school governing board elections.

In school governing board member elections as of now, Laura Metcalfe is leading for EVIT, Patty Kennedy and Natalie Evans Veidmark are leading in Glendale Union High School District, Signa R. Oliver and Stephanie Parra, in Phoenix Union High School District, Amanda Steele and Andres A. Barraza in Tempe Union High School District, Robb Vaules and Amy L. Carney in Scottsdale Unified School District, Elda Luna-Najera and Emilio Avila Solis in Tolleson Union High School District, Marcie Hutchinson and Rachel Walden in Mesa Unified School District, Tamillia N. Valenzuela and Kyle Clayton in Washington Elementary School District, Leanne Greenberg and Violeta M. Ramos in Osborn Elementary School District, Melissa Anne Ewing and Heather Kay Rooks in Peoria Unified School District.

Voters also elected Guadalupe M. Gonzales and Jennifer Ayala in Murphy Elementary School District, Bryan A. Parks and Mark A. Aguire in Liberty Elementary School District, Kevin Walsh and Nelson Trine in Kyrene Elementary School District, Gina Ragsdale and Danielle L. Cornell in Buckeye Elementary School District, Christine M. Thompson and Mitra Khazai in Madison Elementary School District, Jill Humpherys and Chad Thompson in Gilbert Unified School District, Francisca Montoya and Lisa M. Perez in Fowler Elementary School District, Jill M. Barragan and Linda Abegg in Laveen Elementary School District, Amanda Wade and Anna Van Hoek in Higley Unified School District, Amy E. Soucinek, Markus R. Ceniceros and Rachel Barnett in Littleton Elementary School District, Ashley Hodge and Megan Frankiewicz in Roosevelt Elementary School District, Christian Solorio Acuna and Mathew “Mat” Nevarez in Alhambra Elementary School District, Tony Pantera, Sandra Christensen, and Kerry L. Baker in Paradise Valley Unified School District, Kimberly Moran and Ryan Owens in Litchfield Elementary School District, Patti Serrano and Kurt D. Rohrs in Chandler Unified School District, Lydia Hernandez and Pedro Antonio Lopez in Cartwright Elementary School District, Jennifer Drake and Dawn Densmore in Dysart Unified School District, Daniel E. Blackson and Amy Marie Amaral in Saddle Mountain Unified School District, Cindy Cummens and Scott Brown in Cave Creek Unified School District, Samantha Davis and James Knox in Queen Creek Unified School District, Stephanie N. Simacek and Paul Carver in Deer Valley Unified School District, Libby L. Settle, Lillian G. Acker and Madicyn Reid in Fountain Hills Unified School District.

Click here for Maricopa County Elections

Click here for Apache County Elections

Click here for Cochise County Elections

In Cochise County, Willcox Unified School District asks voters to renew a bond, while Benson Unified School District seeks a continuation of an existing 13% budget override.

Click here for Coconino County Elections

This year, Flagstaff Unified School District in Coconino County is asking voters to continue an existing 15% budget override approved by voters in 2018 for seven years.

If voters approve to continue Flagstaff Unified’s existing budget override, then it would maintain all current student programs, current class sizes, art, music and physical education in elementary schools, extracurriculars, provide full-day kindergarten – the state currently funds ½ day,  gifted education, Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, and STEM programs and ensure compliance with state mandates, according to the information pamphlet.

Click here for Gila County Elections

Click here for Graham County Elections

Click here for Greenlee County Elections

Click here for La Paz County Elections

Click here for Mohave County Elections

Click here for Navajo County Elections

Click here for Pima County Elections

In Pima County, Catalina Foothills School District seeks a continuation of its existing override as well as a district additional assistance override and a $38.5 million bond. Marana Unified School District has a $90 million bond measure on the ballot. Sahuarita Unified School District No. 30 has a continuation of its override on the ballot along with a district additional assistance override. Tanque Verde Unified School District No. 13 asks vote

Click here for Pinal County Elections

On the ballot in Pinal County, Casa Grande Elementary School District No. 4 seeks to continue an existing 10% maintenance and operation budget override (Proposition 471), Casa Grande Union High School District No. 82 asks voters to continue an existing 10% maintenance and operation budget override (Prop 472), Santa Cruz Valley Union High School District No. 840 has a new 15% maintenance and operation budget override (Prop 473) on the ballot, and Stanfield Elementary School District No. 24 has a ballot measure for a new 10% maintenance and operation budget override (Prop 474).

Click here for Santa Cruz County Elections

Click here for Yavapai County Elections

Click here for Yuma

Unofficial elections results complete Peoria-drop-box-family-1024x482
A voter drops off her early ballot at Peoria City Hall on Election Day Nov. 8, 2022. Photo by Lisa Irish/ AZEdNews

Updated 6 a.m. to 7:15 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2022: With 100% of all polling place precincts in Arizona reporting results at 7:15 p.m., there were 1,918,628 ballots cast out of 4,143,929 registered voters for a voter turnout of 46.30%. All the early ballots voters dropped off at polling places around the state on Election Day are being signature verified and counted now.

W

Maricopa County Elections says they expect to have the remaining 400,000 early ballots counted by Friday, and said a record number of early ballots were dropped off on Election Day.

See what role young voters played on Election Day and what issues drew them to vote.

Click here for Arizona Secretary of State’s Statewide Elections Results

Click here for Maricopa County Elections Results

More elections results were released at 7:17 a.m. today, and more will be released throughout the day. The next batch of ballots is expected to drop at 6 p.m.

Watch updated election results coverage at 7 p.m.

See what Paul Bentz with HighGround Public Affairs has to say about election results on azfamily now.

Take a quick look at what ABC 15 Arizona’s Data Guru Garrett Archer has to share about what Maricopa County election results look like.

Listen to what Chad Benson has to say about midterm elections on KTAR now.

See what ABC 15 Arizona has to share about key races this morning also.

Maricopa County Election staff started verifying voter signatures for all the early ballots dropped off on Election Day at polling places.

Early results favored Democratic candidates. Some of those leads narrowed today and others reversed as more results came in.

Many Republicans voted in person and turned in their ballots on Election Day.

The Navajo Nation has a new President.

Education election results (updated at 6:58 p.m.)

The Superintendent of Public Instruction election is now too close to call.

Proposition 308, which would let undocumented students who attend an Arizona high school for two years and graduate receive in-state tuition at Arizona’s public universities, currently has 50.84% yes votes.

School bonds, overrides and more (Updated 6:58 p.m.)

Among bond elections as of now, voters approved a bond in Tempe Union High School District as well as Phoenix Elementary School District, Tempe Elementary School District, Washington Elementary School District, Fowler Elementary School District, and Union Elementary School District.

Voters are rejecting a bond in Agua Fria Union High School District, Higley Unified School District, Union Elementary School District, Nadaburg Elementary School District, Queen Creek Unified School District, and Fountain Hills Unified School District.

In budget override elections so far, voters in Buckeye Union High School District approved continuing their budget override as did voters in Agua Fria Union High School District, Glendale Union High School District, Tempe Union High School District, Washington Elementary School District, Osborn Elementary School District, Wickenburg Unified School District, Union Elementary School District, Creighton Elementary School District, Murphy Elementary School District, Paradise Valley Unified School District, Litchfield Elementary School District, and Cartwright Elementary School District.

Voters also approved a budget increase question for Tempe Union High School District, Liberty Elementary School District, Madison Elementary School District, and Scottsdale Unified School District, and Union Elementary School District.

Voters rejected a budget increase for Cave Creek Unified School District and Fountain Hills Unified School District.

So far, voters also have approved the sale, lease or exchange of property in Tolleson Union High School District and Phoenix Elementary School District,

Voters also approved Nadaburg Elementary School District joining West-MEC career and technical education district.

School Board elections

In Maricopa County, early results are in for school governing board elections.

In school governing board member elections as of now, Laura Metcalfe is leading for EVIT, Patty Kennedy and Natalie Evans Veidmark are leading in Glendale Union High School District, Signa R. Oliver and Stephanie Parra, in Phoenix Union High School District, Amanda Steele and Andres A. Barraza in Tempe Union High School District, Robb Vaules and Amy L. Carney in Scottsdale Unified School District, Elda Luna-Najera and Emilio Avila Solis in Tolleson Union High School District, Marcie Hutchinson and Rachel Walden in Mesa Unified School District, Tamillia N. Valenzuela and Kyle Clayton in Washington Elementary School District, Leanne Greenberg and Violeta M. Ramos in Osborn Elementary School District, Melissa Anne Ewing and Heather Kay Rooks in Peoria Unified School District.

Voters also elected Guadalupe M. Gonzales and Jennifer Ayala in Murphy Elementary School District, Bryan A. Parks and Mark A. Aguire in Liberty Elementary School District, Kevin Walsh and Nelson Trine in Kyrene Elementary School District, Gina Ragsdale and Danielle L. Cornell in Buckeye Elementary School District, Christine M. Thompson and Mitra Khazai in Madison Elementary School District, Jill Humpherys and Chad Thompson in Gilbert Unified School District, Francisca Montoya and Lisa M. Perez in Fowler Elementary School District, Jill M. Barragan and Linda Abegg in Laveen Elementary School District, Amanda Wade and Anna Van Hoek in Higley Unified School District, Amy E. Soucinek, Markus R. Ceniceros and Rachel Barnett in Littleton Elementary School District, Ashley Hodge and Megan Frankiewicz in Roosevelt Elementary School District, Christian Solorio Acuna and Mathew “Mat” Nevarez in Alhambra Elementary School District, Tony Pantera, Sandra Christensen, and Kerry L. Baker in Paradise Valley Unified School District, Kimberly Moran and Ryan Owens in Litchfield Elementary School District, Patti Serrano and Kurt D. Rohrs in Chandler Unified School District, Lydia Hernandez and Pedro Antonio Lopez in Cartwright Elementary School District, Jennifer Drake and Dawn Densmore in Dysart Unified School District, Daniel E. Blackson and Amy Marie Amaral in Saddle Mountain Unified School District, Cindy Cummens and Scott Brown in Cave Creek Unified School District, Samantha Davis and James Knox in Queen Creek Unified School District, Stephanie N. Simacek and Paul Carver in Deer Valley Unified School District, Libby L. Settle, Lillian G. Acker and Madicyn Reid in Fountain Hills Unified School District.

Click here for Maricopa County Elections

Click here for Apache County Elections

Click here for Cochise County Elections

In Cochise County, Willcox Unified School District asks voters to renew a bond, while Benson Unified School District seeks a continuation of an existing 13% budget override.

Click here for Coconino County Elections

This year, Flagstaff Unified School District in Coconino County is asking voters to continue an existing 15% budget override approved by voters in 2018 for seven years.

If voters approve to continue Flagstaff Unified’s existing budget override, then it would maintain all current student programs, current class sizes, art, music and physical education in elementary schools, extracurriculars, provide full-day kindergarten – the state currently funds ½ day,  gifted education, Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, and STEM programs and ensure compliance with state mandates, according to the information pamphlet.

Click here for Gila County Elections

Click here for Graham County Elections

Click here for Greenlee County Elections

Click here for La Paz County Elections

Click here for Mohave County Elections

Click here for Navajo County Elections

Click here for Pima County Elections

In Pima County, Catalina Foothills School District seeks a continuation of its existing override as well as a district additional assistance override and a $38.5 million bond. Marana Unified School District has a $90 million bond measure on the ballot. Sahuarita Unified School District No. 30 has a continuation of its override on the ballot along with a district additional assistance override. Tanque Verde Unified School District No. 13 asks vote

Click here for Pinal County Elections

On the ballot in Pinal County, Casa Grande Elementary School District No. 4 seeks to continue an existing 10% maintenance and operation budget override (Proposition 471), Casa Grande Union High School District No. 82 asks voters to continue an existing 10% maintenance and operation budget override (Prop 472), Santa Cruz Valley Union High School District No. 840 has a new 15% maintenance and operation budget override (Prop 473) on the ballot, and Stanfield Elementary School District No. 24 has a ballot measure for a new 10% maintenance and operation budget override (Prop 474).

Click here for Santa Cruz County Elections

Click here for Yavapai County Elections

Click here for Yuma County Elections

Unofficial elections results complete Voters-at-Surprise-Town-Hall-Close-up-1024x611
Voters entering Surprise City Hall to cast their votes on Election Day Nov. 8, 2022. Photo by Lisa Irish/ AZEdNews

Updated 8:12 p.m. to 12:42 a.m.: Early election results were released, and more results were released each hour until the early morning.

With 84% of all precincts in Arizona reporting results, there were 1,468,699 ballots cast out of 4,143,929 registered voters for a voter turnout of 35.44%.

Click here for Arizona Secretary of State’s Statewide Elections Results

Click here for Maricopa County Elections Results

Early results favor Democratic candidates, but analysts expect those leads to be trimmed as more results come in since many Republicans voted in person and turned in their ballots on Election Day.

Watch analysis of election results as they are released.

This first batch of results released at 8 p.m. were made up of early mail-in ballots received before Election Day.

Navajo election officials call the race for Navajo Nation President.

Education election results

Incumbent Kathy Hoffman is leading Tom Horne in election results for Superintendent of Public Instruction.

Proposition 308, which would let undocumented students who attend an Arizona high school for two years and graduate receive in-state tuition at Arizona’s public universities, currently has 55.48% yes votes.

School bonds, overrides and more

Among bond elections as of now, voters approved a bond in Tempe Union High School District as well as Agua Fria Union High School District, Phoenix Elementary School District, Tempe Elementary School District, Washington Elementary School District, Fowler Elementary School District, and Union Elementary School District.

Voters are rejecting a bond in Higley Unified School District and Nadaburg Elementary School District, Queen Creek Unified School District, and Fountain Hills Unified School District.

In budget override elections so far, voters in Buckeye Union High School District approved continuing their budget override as did voters in Glendale Union High School District, Tempe Union High School District, Washington Elementary School District, Osborn Elementary School District, Wickenburg Unified School District, Creighton Elementary School District, Murphy Elementary School District, Paradise Valley Unified School District, Litchfield Elementary School District, and Cartwright Elementary School District.

Voters also approved a budget increase question for Tempe Union High School District, Liberty Elementary School District, Madison Elementary School District, and Scottsdale Unified School District, and Union Elementary School District.

Voters rejected a budget increase for Cave Creek Unified School District and Fountain Hills Unified School District.

So far, voters also have approved the sale, lease or exchange of property in Tolleson Union High School District and Phoenix Elementary School District,

Voters also approved Nadaburg Elementary School District joining West-MEC career and technical education district.

School Board elections

In Maricopa County, early results are in for school governing board elections.

In school governing board member elections as of now, Laura Metcalfe is leading for EVIT, Patty Kennedy and Natalie Evans Veidmark are leading in Glendale Union High School District, Signa R. Oliver and Stephanie Parra, in Phoenix Union High School District, Amanda Steele and Andres A. Barraza in Tempe Union High School District, Robb Vaules and Mary E. Gaudio in Scottsdale Unified School District, Elda Luna-Najera and Devin Del Palacio in Tolleson Union High School District, Marcie Hutchinson and Rachel Walden in Mesa Unified School District, Tamillia N. Valenzuela and Kyle Clayton in Washington Elementary School District, Leanne Greenberg and Violeta M. Ramos in Osborn Elementary School District, Melissa Anne Ewing and Heather K. Rooks in Peoria Unified School District.

Voters also elected Guadalupe M. Gonzales and Jennifer Ayala in Murphy Elementary School District, Bryan A. Parks and Mark A. Aguire in Liberty Elementary School District, Kevin Walsh and Nelson Trine in Kyrene Elementary School District, Gina Ragsdale and Danielle L. Cornell in Buckeye Elementary School District, Christine M. Thompson and Mitra Khazi in Madison Elementary School District, Jill Humpherys and Chad Thompson in Gilbert Unified School District, Francisca Montoya and Lisa M. Perez in Fowler Elementary School District, Jill M. Barragan and Linda Abegg in Laveen Elementary School District, Amanda Wade and Brooke Garrett in Higley Unified School District, Amy E. Soucinek, Markus R. Ceniceros and Rachel Barnett in Littleton Elementary School District, Ashley Hodge and Megan Frankiewicz in Roosevelt Elementary School District, Christian Solorio Acuna and Mathew “Mat” Nevarez in Alhambra Elementary School District, Tony Pantera, Susan Matura and Kerry L. Baker in Paradise Valley Unified School District, Kimberly Moran and Ryan Owens in Litchfield Elementary School District, Patti Serrano and Kurt D. Rohrs in Chandler Unified School District, Lydia Hernandez and Pedro Antonion Lopez in Cartwright Elementary School District, Jennifer Drake and Dawn Densmore in Dysart Unified School District, Daniel E. Blackson and Amy Marie Amaral in Saddle Mountain Unified School District, Cindy Cummens and Scott Brown in Cave Creek Unified School District, Samantha Davis and James Knox in Queen Creek Unified School District, Stephanie N. Simacek and Craig Beckman in Deer Valley Unified School District, Libby L. Settle, Lillian G. Acker and Tara Lamar in Fountain Hills Unified School District.

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Voters going to El Mirage City Hall to cast their early ballots on Election Day Nov. 8, 2022. Photo by Lisa Irish/ AZEdNews

Update 6:59 p.m.: Polls in Arizona are now closed, but people waiting in line by 7 p.m. will be able to cast their ballots.

Maricopa County Superior Court Judge Timothy Ryan denied a request at 6:55 p.m. by the Republican National Committee, Kari Lake and Blake Masters to extend polling place voting hours from 7 p.m. until 10 p.m. and delay the release of early ballot results from 8 p.m. until 11 p.m. after 60 of polling places in Maricopa County had issues with printers connected to tabulators earlier today.

Early election results will be released after 8 p.m. this evening, with new batches released every hour until the early hours of the morning.

Then expect more results to be released throughout the day over the next several days and possibly weeks. Chairman Bill Gates said that about 90 to 95% of the ballots should be counted by Friday.

See what analysts say about voter turnout.

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A ballot drop box sign outside Peoria City Hall on Election Day Nov. 8, 2022. Photo by Lisa Irish/ AZEdNews

Update 6:15 p.m.: The Republican National Committee, Kari Lake and Blake Masters have filed a lawsuit in Maricopa County Superior Court to extend polling place voting hours until 10 p.m. and delay the release of early ballot results until 11 p.m. after 60 of polling places in Maricopa County had issues with printers connected to tabulators earlier today.

In addition, the lawsuit seeks to let voters who choose to leave a voting center without casting a ballot, be checked out of the electronic pollbook and allowed to complete and cast a provisional ballot.

Maricopa County Superior Court Judge Timothy Ryan began hearing the lawsuit at 6:30 p.m.

“We ask you to extend provisional voting only from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m., and we ask that results be delayed by three hours,” said an attorney for the National Republican Party.

The attorney for Maricopa County said at no time was a polling center closed and he asked for the lawsuit to be dismissed.

“We must treat all the counties the same. We cannot have the polls closing in one county later than in the other 14 counties,” an attorney for Maricopa County said.

“To issue an order that a county could actually implement in a way that does not sow voter confusion and unfairness to the voters that otherwise listened to the county’s instructions. It is simply too late for that to be communicated in an orderly fashion given that we are this far away from polls being closed,” an attorney for Maricopa County said.

“The statutes in Arizona law are very clear about polling hours, and it’s very clear on when poll locations are to be closed. There’s been instances in the past where folks on my side of the aisle have attempted to extend voting hours based on delays at various poll locations, and those attempts have been denied by this court. And again, there’s nothing different about the instances in this case and therefore the court should deny an extension of the hours,” said an attorney for Maricopa County.

“These provisional ballots for people who went to the second site and checked out at the first site they’re there but they are not going to be counted under the law as it’s currently written,” said an attorney for the National Republican Party. “I don’t know if that’s going to be material to the outcome of these elections yet, because we don’t have voting, you know, voting results yet, but it very well may be.”

“So we need you to let people cast these provisional votes. We’ll come back later and fight about whether they should be counted. Obviously, if people followed the instructions of the poll workers, and they lost their right because they followed those instructions, that is not right,” said an attorney for the National Republican Party.

“Each voter was given the opportunity to fill out a ballot and put it into the ballot box. If they chose not to, it was a volitional act of the voter,” said an attorney for Maricopa County. “No law required them to not put it in drawer number three. No law told them they had to leave.”

“The law is the same for everyone across the Valley and across the state,” said an attorney for Maricopa County.

“Generally, Election Day voters are folks who have been watching the news over the past couple of years and they’ve got earnest concerns about the way this goes down, about how their ballot is counted, they want to make sure it counts, and one of the benefits of voting on Election Day is you get that piece of paper, you put it in the machine yourself, and you can watch it be counted,” said an attorney for the National Republican Party. “People find that satisfying and it increases confidence in our elections. This is very healthy for our system.”

“We have had two prior election cycles in 2016 and in 2018 where we have had delays, long lines at polling locations and again there was a request for an extension of hours that was denied, because again Arizona law very clearly sets forth the hours at polling locations,” said an attorney for Maricopa County. “In this case, as we’ve been going bakc and forth on, there still in my view has not been any evidence presented that anyone was actually denied the right to vote.”

The judge denied the temporary restraining order.

“As to the statute that applies to the operating hours during elections, the court finds that the Legislature has determined there is a benefit of having a statutory mandated presumptive voting time of 7 p.m.” the Maricopa County Superior Court Judge said.

“The court does not have any evidence in contrary that there were 223 vote centers open and that anyone who showed up between the hours of 6 a.m. and 7 p.m. has been precluded from turning in a ballot, whether it’s an actual ballot or a provisional ballot,” the Maricopa County Superior Court Judge said.

“The declarations from the court’s perspective do show that although there might have been some confusion and some difficulties that all the individuals in the declaration filed either in provisional ballot or in direct ballot did vote,” the Maricopa County Superior Court Judge said.

“The court does not have any evidence of any voter that was precluded the right to vote from what was presented. There was, there is an opportunity until 7 p.m. to get in line and to vote,” the Maricopa County Superior Court Judge said.

“This is something that would be impossible to perform as we’re here at 6:55 and I would have no way to communicate even if I were to agree,” the Maricopa County Superior Court Judge said.

“I’m denying the motion of the temporary restraining order,” the Maricopa County Superior Court Judge said.

The Judge then set a court date for Nov. 16 at 9 a.m. if there is a need for additional court involvement or discussion in the issue.

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Voters drop of their early ballots at Peoria City Hall on Election Day Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2022. Photo by Lisa Irish/ AZEdNews

Before 5 p.m. on Election Day, Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2022: Voting centers open at 6 a.m. and close at 7 p.m. for Election Day, so vote in person or drop off your ballot, then check back for early results after 8 p.m.

In Maricopa County, there have been reports of issues with tabulators at several voting sites. But the issue is being resolved and ballots can still be cast and tabulated at central count under the observation of political parties.

Voters expressed concern about the issue on social media and reporters sought answers from Maricopa County officials.

Early on Election Day, Maricopa County Recorder Stephen Richer, Arizona Secretary of State Katie Hobbs, Chairman Bill Gates and others shared information about the issue and what was being done to resolve it.

Hear how the votes the issue will be resolved.

Things to know if you want to go to another voting center.

If you’re interested in checking if your ballot has been received and tabulated, you can check on that at the Maricopa County Recorders website and receive a text message when it has.

By noon on Election Day, about 103,000 people have voted in person in Maricopa County.

Some voting centers are seeing large numbers of people waiting in line to vote.

The first batch of election results will include early ballots received by each county recorder’s office before Election Day.

Ballots received at ballot drop off locations on Election Day will be processed, signature verified, counted if eligible, and further elections results will be released over the next several days.

Election results remain unofficial until the three-day cure period for questionable signatures, and each county canvasses their votes in the next several days.

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A vote here sign outside El Mirage City Hall on Election Day Nov. 8, 2022. Photo by Lisa Irish/ AZEdNews

Here’s what some analysts are forecasting for these elections.

At the top of the ballot are elections for U.S. Senator, Arizona Governor, Superintendent of Public Instruction, and State Legislators.

Further down on the ballot are nonpartisan elections for for school governing board members, school bonds, school overrides, school district additional assistance and other school related questions.

At the bottom of the ballot are 10 propositions on a wide variety of issues that could change existing laws, create new laws and/ or amend the Arizona Constitution.

School bond, override & additional assistance elections

Arizona school districts are asking voters in their communities to approve bonds, overrides and other ballot measures in the Nov. 8 general elections to generate funding through local property taxes that schools can use for a set time and purpose.

  • Bonds provide a certain amount of money for set projects.
  • Overrides allow a school district to increase their maintenance and operations budget up to 15 percent.
  • Capital/district additional assistance overrides let a school district raise funds up to 10 percent of their revenue control limit.

There are many school issues on the ballot in Arizona statewide, including  override electionsbond electionsand district additional assistance elections. A large number of these elections are in Maricopa County.

Since 2009, local revenue – including school bonds and overrides – has provided much more funding for Arizona public schools than state revenue has.

That contrasts sharply with most states, where state revenue makes up a much more substantial amount of public school funding than local revenue does.

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Infographic by Lisa Irish/ AZEdNews

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For example, 46% of Arizona public school funding in 2017 came from local revenue, compared with 40% from state funding.

That changed for just one year in 2020, when local revenues provided 43.7% of public school funding, just four tenths of a percent less than 44.1% in state revenues, according to the most recent U.S. Census Bureau Public Education Finances: 2020” released in May 2022.

That reversal was short lived.

In 2021, local revenue again provided more funding for Arizona public schools – 42.5% – compared with 39.7%, from state revenue, according to preliminary tables from “U.S. Census Bureau Public Education Finances: 2021” released in August 2022.

Voters in some school districts have historically approved bonds and overrides, providing more local funding for student programs, teacher salaries, reduced class sizes and more.

Meanwhile, other school districts where bonds and overrides have been rejected by voters have been unable to generate that additional local funding, which puts them at a disadvantage when compared with neighboring school districts.

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Infographic by Angelica Miranda/ AZEdNews

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School elections by county

In Maricopa County, 10 school districts would like voters to approve bonds in these general elections, 15 school districts seek budget overrides, four ask voters to decide on district additional assistance overrides, two would like voters to determine if they sell property and one seeks voter input on joining West-MEC.

Click here for Maricopa County Elections

Click here for Apache County Elections

Click here for Cochise County Elections

In Cochise County, Willcox Unified School District asks voters to renew a bond, while Benson Unified School District seeks a continuation of an existing 13% budget override.

Click here for Coconino County Elections

This year, Flagstaff Unified School District in Coconino County is asking voters to continue an existing 15% budget override approved by voters in 2018 for seven years.

If voters approve to continue Flagstaff Unified’s existing budget override, then it would maintain all current student programs, current class sizes, art, music and physical education in elementary schools, extracurriculars, provide full-day kindergarten – the state currently funds ½ day,  gifted education, Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, and STEM programs and ensure compliance with state mandates, according to the information pamphlet.

Click here for Gila County Elections

Click here for Graham County Elections

Click here for Greenlee County Elections

Click here for La Paz County Elections

Click here for Mohave County Elections

Click here for Navajo County Elections

Click here for Pima County Elections

In Pima County, Catalina Foothills School District seeks a continuation of its existing override as well as a district additional assistance override and a $38.5 million bond. Marana Unified School District has a $90 million bond measure on the ballot. Sahuarita Unified School District No. 30 has a continuation of its override on the ballot along with a district additional assistance override. Tanque Verde Unified School District No. 13 asks voters to continue its existing override.

Click here for Pinal County Elections

On the ballot in Pinal County, Casa Grande Elementary School District No. 4 seeks to continue an existing 10% maintenance and operation budget override (Proposition 471), Casa Grande Union High School District No. 82 asks voters to continue an existing 10% maintenance and operation budget override (Prop 472), Santa Cruz Valley Union High School District No. 840 has a new 15% maintenance and operation budget override (Prop 473) on the ballot, and Stanfield Elementary School District No. 24 has a ballot measure for a new 10% maintenance and operation budget override (Prop 474).

Click here for Santa Cruz County Elections

Click here for Yavapai County Elections

Click here for Yuma County Elections