Maricopa Community Colleges celebrate National Native American Heritage Month with music, stories, discussions - AZEdNews
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Maricopa Community Colleges celebrate National Native American Heritage Month with music, stories, discussions


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  • Dasi Danzig   |   Maricopa Community Colleges

Month Graphic From Maricopa Community Colleges

In celebration of National Native American Heritage Month in November, the Maricopa County Community College District (MCCCD) invites community members to attend events at many of the Maricopa Community Colleges. 

“For us, it’s not just a month. While the Maricopa Community Colleges are eager to celebrate National Native American Heritage Month, we also believe in celebrating our students’ diverse backgrounds and cultures whenever possible,” said MCCCD Interim Chancellor, Dr. Steven R. Gonzales.

“Our District works hard to offer support to our Native students with programs like Hoop of Learning, a high-school-to-college bridge program to provide Native American students with a pathway to higher education,” Dr. Gonzales said.

“It is important to remember and acknowledge our campuses are located on the ancestral lands and within the boundaries of many of Arizona’s tribal nations,” Dr. Gonzales said.

“We appreciate and value the opportunity we have to share in the significance and beauty of these lands that mean so much to so many,” Dr. Gonzales said.

At the Maricopa County Community College District (MCCCD), we have experienced firsthand how education can help inspire and empower the leaders of tomorrow, while recognizing and honoring those who helped pave the way. As we observe National Native American Heritage Month this November, we are reminded of the countless Indigenous leaders who have inspired Native American people across the country, including:

  • John Herrington, an astronaut and the first Native American in space, who is a member of the Chickasaw Nation.
  • Maria Tallchief, the country’s first Native American prima ballerina, who is a member of Oklahoma’s Osage Nation.
  • Dave Anderson, founder and CEO of national chain Famous Dave’s Barbeque, who is an enrolled member of the Lac Courte Oreilles Lake Superior Band of Ojibwe of northwest Wisconsin.
  • Ben Nighthorse Campbell, who was elected to serve Colorado in the U.S. Senate in 1992 and was the first Native American to serve in the Senate in over 60 years, and is a descendant of the Northern Cheyenne Tribe.
  • Sharice Davids, a member of Wisconsin’s Ho-Chunk Nation, and Deb Haaland, a member of the Laguna Pueblo tribe in New Mexico, who are the first Native American women ever elected to Congress.
  • Charlene Teters, an activist who was one of the first to speak out against the use of Native American stereotypes in sports team names and mascots, who is of the Spokane Tribe.

MCCCD is committed to providing our Indigenous community with tools and skills that align with our mission in ways that allow students to succeed in their academic endeavors, in addition to supporting and empowering Indigenous students and communities in Arizona with opportunities for cultural and academic support, engagement, and advocacy. 

At all 10 of our regionally-accredited colleges, we offer an early high school-to-college bridge program called Hoop of Learning, which aims to reduce economic cultural barriers that American Indians may face and helps high school students successfully transition to college.

In addition to this transition-to-college program, we also offer student scholarships to help make college more affordable and an American Indian Outreach program to encourage and support the educational attainment of American Indian students at MCCCD.

Select colleges also support our students’ unique needs with programs and centers, including:

For students who want to be more involved in the Native community or pursue an education studying Native American heritage, we also offer student clubs and organizations at many colleges, in addition to an academic certificate in American Indian Studies. We also recognize that it is important to acknowledge that many of our campuses are located on the ancestral lands or within the boundaries of many of Arizona’s tribal nations, and value the opportunity to share the beauty and significance of these lands with our students, faculty and staff.

At MCCCD, we believe that celebrating heritage should not be confined to just a month and we are proud to celebrate Native American culture year-round.

Events happening throughout the District in November allow participants to explore Native American heritage through music, storytelling, discussions, and panels, addressing both Native culture and bringing light to subjects like cultural appropriation and the murders of Indigenous women and girls.

Maricopa Community Colleges celebrate National Native American Heritage Month with music, stories, discussions Maricopa-Community-Colleges-Logo

Indigenous Visions: Four Principles of Cultural Humility

November 2, 2020

Virtual Event | 10 – 11:30 a.m.

Join Event  

For National Native American Heritage Month, join MCCCD as it celebrates and recognizes the accomplishments of the peoples who were the original inhabitants, explorers, and settlers of the United States.

Maricopa Community Colleges celebrate National Native American Heritage Month with music, stories, discussions logo-rgb-cgcc

Native American Mascots and Cultural Appropriation

November 19, 2020

Virtual Event | 5:30 p.m.

Join Event

Join Dr. Adrienne Keene, Native American academic, writer, and activist, to discuss the ways pop culture represents Native people, how these images affect contemporary Indigenous communities, and how Native communities are pushing back against misrepresentation.

This discussion will also answer the questions: What is cultural appropriation? Who has the right to represent Native cultures? How do Hollywood, the fashion industry, and sports mascots contribute to the marginalization of Native people?

Maricopa Community Colleges celebrate National Native American Heritage Month with music, stories, discussions Phoenix-College-Logo

Flute and Stories with Randy Kemp

November 12, 2020

Virtual Event | 6 – 7 p.m.

Join Event

Passcode: 315832

Enjoy music and stories with Randy Kemp, Native American music artist and member of the Euchee, Muscogee, and Choctaw tribes.

Maricopa Community Colleges celebrate National Native American Heritage Month with music, stories, discussions Scottsdale-Community-College-Logo

Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women Presentation

November 10, 2020

Virtual Event | 4 – 6 p.m.

Join Event

Meeting ID: 1460211533

Password: pyy9aWAq

Join Scottsdale Community College for a presentation from State Representative Jennifer Jermaine, who is the chair of Arizona’s investigative committee for Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls.