Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high - AZEdNews
Sections    Thursday October 1st, 2020
Twitter Profile Facebook Profile LinkedIn Profile RSS Profile
| SUBSCRIBE

Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high


COVID 19 Image From AZ DHS HP

Dysart Unified School District to lay off 143 teachers.

Chandler Unified School District has it’s first day of school, and it was said that it went well.

Click here for coverage June 13 and onward

Updated June 12: Today’s 1,654 increase in COVID-9 cases marks a new daily high.

Confirmed COVID-19 cases in Arizona rose to 32,918 today from 31,264 yesterday, and 1,144 have died from the virus, said the Arizona Department of Health.

Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high 6-12-Summary

In Maricopa County, there are 17,010 confirmed cases of COVID-19, 3,628 in Pima County, 2,512 in Navajo County, 1,345 in Coconino County, 1,363 in Pinal County, 367 in Yavapai County, 1,927 in Apache County, 2,841 in Yuma County, 584 in Mohave County, 178 in Cochise County, 833 in Santa Cruz County, 48 in Graham County, 217 in La Paz County, 54 in Gila County and 11 in Greenlee County.

People 20 to 44 years old had the largest number of confirmed COVID-19 cases at 14,654, followed by people 45 to 54 years old with 5,213 cases, then people 65 years and older with 5,181 cases, people from 55 to 64 years old with 4,437 cases and people under 20 years old with 3,406 cases, according to the Arizona Department of Health Services.

Thirty-seven percent of confirmed COVID-19 cases are in people of unknown race/ethnicity, 19% in White/Non-Hispanic, 26% in Hispanic or Latino, 12% Native American, 3% Black/Non-Hispanic and 1% Asian/ Pacific Islander and 3% Other/Non-Hispanic.

Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high 6-12-Confirmed-COVID-Cases-by-Day

Twenty-six percent of people who had confirmed COVID-19 cases had a chronic medical condition and 34% were high risk – 65 or more years old with one or more chronic medical condition. Fifty-three percent of people with confirmed cases of COVID-19 are female.

Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high 6-12-Hospitalization

Forty-six percent of COVID-19 deaths were in White/Non-Hispanic people, 12% in people of unknown race/ethnicity, 18% Native American, 18% Hispanic or Latino, 3% Black/Non-Hispanic and 1% Asian/ Pacific Islander and 2% Other/Non-Hispanic.

More men, 54%, than women, and more people 65 years old or older – 872 – have died from COVID-19 in Arizona.

Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high 6-12-Deaths

There were 429 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in congregate settings such as assisted living, long-term care facilities, prisons, rehab facilities, hospitals, shelters, workplace, dialysis clinics, private residential, hospice, childcare/daycare, college/university, outpatient clinics and religious facilities.

Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high 6-12-Congregate-settings

A special session for the Arizona Legislature to deal with COVID-19 initially seemed inevitable, but now it looks unlikely, the Arizona Capitol Times reports.

Education leaders tell the U.S. Senate schools need more federal money to avoid layoffs of staff at high-poverty schools.

See how three teachers are helping their students with the death of George Floyd.

Family and friends mourn Dion Johnson at his funeral today weeks after he was fatally shot by a AZ DPS officer.

The FBI said it will review evidence in Dion Johnson’s case alongside the Arizona U.S. Attorney’s Office and the Dept. of Justice’s Civil Rights Division.

Need help identifying and addressing barriers holding back students of color? Annie E. Casey Foundation offers their help.

Protesters marched through downtown Phoenix again early Friday evening.

Sesame Street joins CNN for a new family town hall on COVID-19 and staying safe this summer.

Schools know that the relationships they built with students before the closures have been key to successful distance learning.

During Pride Month, Solomon Elementary School District’s Governing Board president reminds us that LGBTQ+ awareness and acceptance helps all students in Arizona’s public schools.

First Things First congratulated Trena Antonio as their San Carlos Apache Region Champion for Young Children.

Arizona State University is requiring all people on campus to wear face coverings.

Pressure increases for colleges to provide job training to get through the recession.

Updated June 11: Arizona hospitals are prepared to take care of patients with COVID-19, Gov. Ducey said during a news conference at 2 p.m. today, noting that the Health System Alliance of Arizona said they are well prepared to managed an increase in patient volume.

AZ Department of Health Services video: COVID-19 News Conference June 11

There has been a clear increase in cases and there is a clear increase in testing from the Arizona Testing Blitz, Gov. Ducey.

“The increase in positive tests is not the direction we want to go,” Gov. Ducey said. “We want to go in the other direction.”

“We have capacity in our hospital beds,” Gov. Ducey said. “We have of ICU beds in our facilities in Arizona no matter what you are sick with.”

Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high 6-11-Then-and-Now

In the past week 19 states have seen an increase in cases over the past week, Gov. Ducey said.

“We’re going to continue our gradual and phased in re-opening,” Gov. Ducey said.

“Our testing in Arizona has doubled since the Stay at Home order expired,” Gov. Ducey said.

“We want to return smarter as a state, yet this a virus we will remain focused and vigilant around,” Gov. Ducey said.

“COVID-19 is still widspread in our community,” said Dr. Cara Christ.

Dr. Christ said Arizona businesses will develop distancing and disinfecting protocols to help employees remain safe in the workplace.

Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high 6-11-Dr.-Christ

So far, 15,000 staff and residents of long-term care facilities have been tested, Dr. Christ said.

“We are working with the Dept. of Corrections to implement infection control surveys and are currently going out on site to the facilities,” Dr. Christ said.

“The plan going forward is that we will continue to focus on public health and the education campaign around it,” Gov. Ducey said. “Physical distancing, washing your hands, staying home if you’re sick and wearing a cloth face covering when you cannot physically distance.”

Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high 6-11-plan-going-forward

“We’ll continue to increase testing in the State of Arizona, which will give us more sightline to what our situation is at the state level,” Gov. Ducey said.

“We’ll have a constant focus on cases and hospital capacity,” Gov. Ducey said. “We’ge got a team of 44 experienced epidemiologists tracking the data in real time, the number of cases and the hospitalization rate with surveillance and load balancing of our hospital resources.”

“And we’re going to prioritize where the risk is highest in Arizona,” Gov. Ducey said. “It’s in our skilled nursing facilities, our long-term care and our prisons.”

When asked if he let his Stay at Home order expire too soon, Gov. Ducey said, “This has always been about saving lives and it’s also been about livelihoods in the State of Arizona. We put the Stay at Home order there so we could prepare for what we are going through right now, and we are prepared for it.”

“This is not yet behind us. We’re navigating through this,” Gov. Ducey said.

Gov. Ducey also noted that there was no further re-opening steps announced today.

Confirmed COVID-19 cases in Arizona rose to 31,264 today from 29,852 yesterday, and 1,127 have died from the virus, said the Arizona Department of Health.

In Maricopa County, there are 16,018 confirmed cases of COVID-19, 3,479 in Pima County, 2,479 in Navajo County, 1,317 in Coconino County, 1,281 in Pinal County, 359 in Yavapai County, 1,887 in Apache County, 2,585 in Yuma County, 563 in Mohave County, 171 in Cochise County, 805 in Santa Cruz County, 48 in Graham County, 211 in La Paz County, 48 in Gila County and 12 in Greenlee County.

Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high 6-11-summary

To eliminate the lack of access to technology and the Internet that were barriers to distance learning when schools were closed for the COVID-19 pandemic, Arizona Supt. of Public Instruction Kathy Hoffman has convened a Technology Task Force to develop solutions.

Looking for a way to encourage students to read more? Los Angeles Unified School District partnered with Snapchat to create a celebrity book club for students.

Glendale Community College’s Career Services is reaching out to students on social media with career advice and more.

Updated June 10: As people await the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision, Lumina Foundation says helping the 650,000 DACA recipients, or Dreamers, undocumented children brought to the United States by their parents, is in the nation’s interest. A decision could come as soon as this month or by Oct. 4, 2020.

Hear what Supt. of Public Instruction Kathy Hoffman said about re-opening Arizona schools after COVID-19, in a KJZZ 91.5 FM interview.

Kyrene School District described the learning pathways available for students in the Fall.

Education Week examines whether police officers belong in schools after the the killing of George Floyd in police custody last month.

Students and families took part in a Rivals for Justice March today in Ahwatukee from Mountain Pointe High School to Desert Vista High School, The Arizona Republic reports.

This study on the grade point averages of students of color before and after police killings shows a considerable drop in the four months afterwards, according to Education Week.

Confirmed COVID-19 cases in Arizona rose to 29,852 today from 28,296 yesterday, and 1,095 have died from the virus, said the Arizona Department of Health.

In Maricopa County, there are 15,282 confirmed cases of COVID-19, 3,350 in Pima County, 2,388 in Navajo County, 1,310 in Coconino County, 1,209 in Pinal County, 348 in Yavapai County, 1,811 in Apache County, 2,439 in Yuma County, 552 in Mohave County, 167 in Cochise County, 688 in Santa Cruz County, 45 in Graham County, 205 in La Paz County, 48 in Gila County and 10 in Greenlee County.

Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high 6-10-Summary

Maricopa County Supt. of Schools Steve Watson encourages teachers to take partand find inspiration in their teacher forum.

Arizona State University said Senior Associate Dean Kristin Gilger will become interim dean of the Cronkite School effective immediately.

Updated June 9: Arizona’s education system has been disrupted by COVID-19, so maybe it’s time to re-imagine it, said Rachel Yanoff, Achieve 60 executive director.

Gov. Doug Ducey met with Janelle Wood, founder of the Black Mothers Forum and said he’ll build on ideas they discussed.

In response to the protests, Phoenix police will stop using a hold that cuts the flow of blood to the brain, Chief Jeri Williams said.

Black and Latino students are also facing the possibility of school closures, Education Week says.

Seeking classroom resources to help students build empathy, understanding and tolerance? The Southern Poverty Law Center provides this resource.

The Community Foundation for Southern Arizona encourages people to be antiracist and to learn more.

African-American, American Indian and Latino children face some of the biggest obstacles on the path to opportunity, according to the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s Race for Results report.

Confirmed COVID-19 cases in Arizona rose to 28,296 today from 27,678 yesterday, and 1,070 have died from the virus, said the Arizona Department of Health.

In Maricopa County, there are 14,374 confirmed cases of COVID-19, 3,161 in Pima County, 2,253 in Navajo County, 1,289 in Coconino County, 1,164 in Pinal County, 340 in Yavapai County, 1,747 in Apache County, 2,378 in Yuma County, 513 in Mohave County, 156 in Cochise County, 633 in Santa Cruz County, 42 in Graham County, 189 in La Paz County, 47 in Gila County and 10 in Greenlee County.

Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high 6-9-summary

Head Start is encouraging people to do good for others.

School sports practices will look different after COVID-19.

Community connections provide key support for parents of young children, according to First Things First.

Madison Elementary School District reminds families that their virtual town hall will stream Wednesday night starting at 6 p.m.

Arizona Association of Gifted and Talented are seeking mathletes in third through 8th grades to take part in Summer Blitz Virtual Tournaments.

To get ready for college this Fall, Northern Arizona University reminds students to take these steps.

Glendale Community College celebrates Pride Month and encourages people to learn more about its history.

Arizona State University reminds students to sign up for upcoming webinars if they have questions about the upcoming Fall semester.

Updated June 8: Some schools are canceling plans for in-person classes this fall, saying the U.S. Centers for Disease Control’s safety recommendations for reopening after Covid-19 may cost about $2 million more than has been budgeted for, according to a U.S. News & World report story.

As schools plan for classes starting in the Fall, there will be changes to what students and staff experience.

First Things First has partnered with nurses to share books and literacy guides with families.

ASU rescinded its offer to Sonya Forte Duhé to become dean for Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication after hearing allegations about her treatment of minority students.

Kids can access digital resources and ebooks to read and take part in Scholastic’s Summer Read-A-Palooza.

An Empire High School student who passed away yesterday made sure he gave back to student athletes at his school with his Make A Wish request, according to an Arizona Republic article.

Confirmed COVID-19 cases in Arizona rose to 27,678 today from 24,332 Friday, and 1,047 have died from the virus, said the Arizona Department of Health.

In Maricopa County, there are 14,003 confirmed cases of COVID-19, 3,154 in Pima County, 2,229 in Navajo County, 1,290 in Coconino County, 1,127 in Pinal County, 330 in Yavapai County, 1,732 in Apache County, 2,257 in Yuma County, 512 in Mohave County, 149 in Cochise County, 615 in Santa Cruz County, 41 in Graham County, 183 in La Paz County, 46 in Gila County and 10 in Greenlee County.

Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high 6-8-summary

People 20 to 44 years old had the largest number of confirmed COVID-19 cases at 11,947, followed by people 65 years and older with 4,655 cases, then people 45 to 54 years old with 4.426 cases, people from 55 to 64 years old with 3,820 cases and people under 20 years old with 2,811 cases, according to the Arizona Department of Health Services.

Just weeks after Gov. Doug Ducey said Arizona businesses could re-open, Arizona Department of Health Services Director Dr. Cara Christ sent a letter to hospitals on June 6 urging them to activate emergency plans and a day later Banner Health said it’s intensive care unit beds in use was growing, according to an Arizona Republic article.

As of today Maricopa County has the 26th highest number of confirmed COVID-19 cases of any county in the U.S., according to John Hopkins University.

Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high 6-8-Hospital-bed-usage-and-availability

Thirty-six percent of confirmed COVID-19 cases are in people of unknown race/ethnicity, 21% in White/Non-Hispanic, 24% in Hispanic or Latino, 13% Native American, 3% Black/Non-Hispanic and 1% Asian/ Pacific Islander and 3% Other/Non-Hispanic.

Twenty-six percent of people who had confirmed COVID-19 cases had a chronic medical condition and 35% were high risk – 65 or more years old with one or more chronic medical condition. Fifty-three percent of people with confirmed cases of COVID-19 are female.

Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high 6-8-Confirmed-COVID-cases-by-day

Forty-seven percent of COVID-19 deaths were in White/Non-Hispanic people, 11% in people of unknown race/ethnicity, 18% Native American, 17% Hispanic or Latino, 3% Black/Non-Hispanic and 1% Asian/ Pacific Islander and 2% Other/Non-Hispanic.

More men, 54%, than women, and more people 65 years old or older – 808- have died from COVID-19 in Arizona.

Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high 6-8-Covid-Deaths

There were 408 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in congregate settings such as assisted living, long-term care facilities, prisons, rehab facilities, hospitals, shelters, workplace, dialysis clinics, private residential, hospice, childcare/daycare, college/university, outpatient clinics and religious facilities.

Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high 6-8-Congregate-Settings

Gov. Doug Ducey’s curfew order has expired and it won’t be extended.

Thousands of people outside the U.S. took part in demonstrations to show support for America protestors.

The Phoenix City Council approved a budget today that included nearly $3 million for a new police oversight office.

Updated June 5: Phoenix Union High School District students marched today to the district office to demand it terminate its contract with the Phoenix Police Department.

In-person classes at ASU will resume on Aug. 20.

Crane Elementary shared their commitment to providing a safe, respectful and equitable learning environment.

Michael Jordan said he will donate $100 million over 10 years to racial equality causes.

Confirmed COVID-19 cases in Arizona rose to 24,332 today from 22,753 yesterday, and 1,012 have died from the virus, said the Arizona Department of Health.

In Maricopa County, there are 12,091 confirmed cases of COVID-19, 2,883 in Pima County, 2,104 in Navajo County, 1,248 in Coconino County, 1,018 in Pinal County, 314 in Yavapai County, 1,656 in Apache County, 1,708 in Yuma County, 447 in Mohave County, 120 in Cochise County, 503 in Santa Cruz County, 40 in Graham County, 149 in La Paz County, 42 in Gila County and 9 in Greenlee County.

Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high 6-5-COVID-Summary

Updated June 4: Watch it live as Gov. Doug Ducey, Arizona Dept. of Public Safety Director Col. Heston Silbert, Arizona National Guard Maj. Gen Michael McGuire and Arizona Department of Health Services Director Dr. Cara Christ discuss the curfew, protests and COVID-19 during a news conference today.

“The suffering and death of George Floyd is tragic and abhorrent. It’s an American tragedy,” Gov. Ducey said. “It should be condemned by leaders at every level.”

“In Arizona, we will listen to those who want to have a civil discourse to ensure that it never happens again in the United States of America and that we make the proper reforms and improvement at the state, national and federal level,” Gov. Ducey said.

VIdeo courtesy Arizona Dept. of Health Services: COVID-19 News Conference June 4, 2020

Thousands of Arizonans have come out to peacefully protest every day to have their voices heard, exercise their First Amendment rights, and to ask for justice, Gov. Ducey said.

“We’re looking at this as a moment where change can happen for the better in our nation,” Gov. Ducey said.

“A much smaller group that wanted to riot and loot have come out as well,” Gov. Ducey said.

Gov. Ducey thanked first responders for their service during this time “when people want to be heard, they’ve seen an injustice and they want to see change.”

Gov. Ducey said he talked to more than 20 mayors Sunday and law enforcement leaders across the state to ensure that peaceful protest can happen and that people and property are protected.

“Racism exists here in Arizona and in our world,” Gov. Ducey said. “It is incumbent on all of us to do all we can do to stop it.”

On Saturday, Gov. Ducey said he met with African-American leaders and had a discussion, and they came up with a list of things they can deliver on.

“In consultation with law enforcement leaders, there is a statewide curfew through Sunday, June 7 from 8 p.m. to 5 a.m.,” Gov. Ducey said.

“In my 31 years in law enforcement, I don’t think I’ve seen anything as horrific or tragic as what happened to George Floyd in Minneapolis, Minnesota,” said Col. Silbert.

“Everything I’ve seen by the people of Arizona – the way they protested – has been a commentary on their character and really to our state,” Col. Silbert said.

“People don’t go stand in the heat by the thousands unless they care. They care about this cause. They care about what’s going on. They care about the improvement and we care, ” Col. Silbert said.

“We always know we can do a better job in law enforcement. And we understand that we’re only as strong as the violations that one person commits, and unfortunately we all have to answer for that,” Col. Silbert said. “But if improvement comes from that, and it certainly should from this situation, I hope for better days ahead.”

“I hope we grow going forward and become a better nation and a better community,” Col. Silbert said.

“I’m very confident that while the state and the nation are in pain, that our great citizens in this state who have an unbelievable reservoir of patriotic capital will rise to the occasion and work together to create a peaceable environment,” said Maj. Gen McGuire.

Gov. Ducey said Arizona will continue with its approach to the COVID-19 pandemic.

We don’t have a downward trend in COVID -19 cases by day established, Gov. Ducey said.

“We have seen some growth in cases as of late,” Gov. Ducey said.

As of today, Arizona Dept. of Health Services has completed the infection control surveys of 126 Medicare certified skilled nursing facilities, about 88 percent, 16 more surveys will be complete by the end of the week and all should be complete by June 9th, said Dr. Christ.

Testing has been completed at 71 long-term care facilities with a total of 8,227 staff and residents tested so far and that is scheduled to be complete for all facilities by June 11, Dr. Christ said.

COVID-19 testing is being done at Arizona Department of Corrections facilities throughout the state with the help of SonoraQuest Labs, Dr. Christ said.

The increase in the number of COVID-19 cases recently “was expected. These are dependent on a number of things, including increasing testing,” Dr. Christ said.

Some statewide trends the AZ Dept. of Health Services are monitoring closely include an increase in cases across the southern border of the state, increases of cases in Mexico, large numbers within tribal communities and eastern and central regions as well, Dr. Christ said.

The Arizona Surge line has helped with the transfer of more than 500 patients to the appropriate level of care throughout the state, Dr. Christ said.

Dr. Christ reminded Arizonans that they all have a part to play to reduce the spread of COVID-19 by continuing to wash their hands and using hand sanitizer, avoid touching their faces, cover their coughs and sneezes, disinfect surfaces regularly, use face coverings while out in public and to stay home if they’re feeling sick and follow the advice of their medical provider.

Gov. Ducey thanked school leaders for their work on developing guidance for students to get back to school.

As schools prepare to welcome back students in the Fall, Expect More Arizona encourages people to contact their state legislators and ask them to protect K-12 public education funding.

Sixty percent of Arizonans would increase education funding, according to a recent survey, KJZZ 91.5 FM says.

New research shows killing by police hurt grades and graduation rates of nearby Black and Hispanic students, according to Education Next.

Phoenix Union High School District students pressure district to end school resource officer program.

The Arizona Parent Teacher Association offers some insight into trauma and how it affects students and their families.

The terms used to describe education issues can have long-term effects on public perception, according to Education Week.

WestEd researchers are seeking people to share their experiences of K-8 science instruction during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Confirmed COVID-19 cases in Arizona rose to 22,753 today from 22,223 yesterday, and 996 have died from the virus, said the Arizona Department of Health.

In Maricopa County, there are 11,229 confirmed cases of COVID-19, 2,669 in Pima County, 2,042 in Navajo County, 1,221 in Coconino County, 948 in Pinal County, 307 in Yavapai County, 1,637 in Apache County, 1,510 in Yuma County, 428 in Mohave County, 105 in Cochise County, 462 in Santa Cruz County, 38 in Graham County, 110 in La Paz County, 39 in Gila County and 8 in Greenlee County.

Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high 6-4-summary

Updated June 3: A new Education Week survey shows teachers are concerned about returning to in-person classroom instruction in the Fall after COVID-19 school closures.

A statewide poll by High Ground Public Affairs of likely Arizona voters shows 57 percent of parents with children support sending them back to school in the fall, according to a 3 TV/ CBS 5 news story.

Tucson Unified School District Supt. Gabriel Trujillo said what the Arizona Dept. of Ed guidelines for re-opening school is missing is a new funding source or “new mechanism to pay for the very, very costly recommendations that are being recommended in this roadmap,” in an interview with Arizona Public Media.

Nogales Unified Supt. Ferdando Parra tells KJZZ 91.5 FM that he’s not sure how many students will return to classrooms in the rural school district for the new school year and talks about his concerns about their plan.

See what other school districts have planned to re-open schools in the Fall in this ABC 15 Arizona story and interactive map.

A teacher in a rural community and one in an urban one share how access to the internet has affected student learning during the COVID-19 closures and what they’re doing to bridge that gap.

Most Deer Valley Unified School District Office staff are back to work next week.

Creighton Elementary School District Superintendent Dr. Donna Lewis has partnered with school superintendents across Phoenix to create school environments that promote inclusivity and professional development to achieve that.

The National Association of Secondary School Principals encourages school leaders to do their part in building a more just future for all students.

Save Our Schools Arizona encourages people to sign up for this webinar about equity, education and the new normal after COVID-19 school closures.

Teach for America in Baltimore shares this resource for how to be an empathetic listener during times of racial injustice.

Student led investigations of justice-centered phenomena and develop solutions to problems are one way to engage students in projects that support equity for communities and see how science in entwined with political and ethical questions, dimensions and decisions.

The National Science Teaching Association said “equity is at the heart of science and teaching, and education is a beacon of light for our students,” and that “in the coming months, we will be providing additional resources all teachers can use to create inclusive, socially just classrooms.”

Sesame Street will host a town hall addressing racism on Saturday morning.

The Arizona Interscholastic Association released last week recommendations for schools holding student athlete summer workouts.

Microcredentials are becoming more important as people who are unemployed seek new work.

Confirmed COVID-19 cases in Arizona rose to 22,223 today from 21,250 yesterday, and 981 have died from the virus, said the Arizona Department of Health.

In Maricopa County, there are 11,068 confirmed cases of COVID-19, 2,627 in Pima County, 1,994 in Navajo County, 1,186 in Coconino County, 940 in Pinal County, 304 in Yavapai County, 1,586 in Apache County, 1,387 in Yuma County, 422 in Mohave County, 94 in Cochise County, 438 in Santa Cruz County, 41 in Graham County, 91 in La Paz County, 37 in Gila County and 8 in Greenlee County.

Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high 6-3-Summary-COVID

People 20 to 44 years old had the largest number of confirmed COVID-19 cases at 9,62, followed by people 65 years and older with 4,120 cases, then people 45 to 54 years old with 3,614 cases, people from 55 to 64 years old with 3,184 cases and people under 20 years old with 2,126 cases, according to the Arizona Department of Health Services.

Thirty-two percent of confirmed COVID-19 cases are in people of unknown race/ethnicity, 23% in White/Non-Hispanic, 24% in Hispanic or Latino, 14% Native American, 3% Black/Non-Hispanic and 1% Asian/ Pacific Islander and 3% Other/Non-Hispanic.

Twenty-eight percent of people who had confirmed COVID-19 cases had a chronic medical condition and 38% were high risk – 65 or more years old with one or more chronic medical condition. Fifty-three percent of people with confirmed cases of COVID-19 are female.

Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high 6-3-Confirmed-COVID-Cases

Forty-seven percent of COVID-19 deaths were in White/Non-Hispanic people, 12% in people of unknown race/ethnicity, 19% Native American, 16% Hispanic or Latino, 3% Black/Non-Hispanic and 1% Asian/ Pacific Islander and 2% Other/Non-Hispanic.

More men, 54%, than women, and more people 65 years old or older – 759 – have died from COVID-19 in Arizona.

Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high 6-3-COVID-Deaths

There were 367 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in congregate settings such as assisted living, long-term care facilities, prisons, rehab facilities, hospitals, shelters, workplace, dialysis clinics, private residential, hospice, childcare/daycare, college/university, outpatient clinics and religious facilities.

Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high 6-3-Congregate-settings

Updated June 2: Save Our Schools Arizona said they appreciate Superintendent of Public Instruction Kathy Hoffman’s guidance for re-opening Arizona public schools next month, but schools need more funding to implement the suggestions.

“Virtually none of this guidance is achievable due to the Arizona State Legislature’s continued underfunding of public education,” said Dawn Penich-Thacker, co-founder and communications director of Save Our Schools Arizona.

Mesa Public Schools Incoming Supt. Dr. Andi Fourlis said the guidelines are helpful as school districts statewide decide what back to school will look like for their students and staff in an ABC 15 Arizona article.

The guidelines include recommendations about increased cleaning and sanitization for classrooms and throughout school facilities as well as rethinking what lunch, recess, labs, group activities, sports, bus transportation, and travel between classes will look like.

For now, Mesa schools plan to start in-person instruction for students on August 4, but their will be distance learning options for students and staff who prefer that.

Arizona Education Association’s Marisol Garcia tells KJZZ 91.5 FM that the move to re-open schools for the Fall is premature.

Noell Hyman, the father of a high school senior said in an Arizona Republic article that he hopes his son’s school will spend fewer days each week for in-person instruction and more in online classes.

The Learning Policy Institute has estimated that the Arizona Legislature would need to add $645 million in new funding to Arizona’s current K-12 education budget to minimally address the impact of COVID-19, Save Our Schools Arizona said.

“Without adding up to $645 million in new dollars to the education budget during the anticipated special session, Governor Ducey and the Legislature are endangering 1.1 million Arizona students, more than 100,000 public school teachers and staff, and countless millions of parents, grandparents and community members with whom they will be in contact,” Penich-Thacker said.

Currently, Arizona public schools have the second-most crowded classrooms in the nation and such low capital funding that leaking roofs, malfunctioning ventilation, and unsafe buses are common across the state.

Many Arizona districts cannot afford to employ school nurses or aides, while Arizona teachers leave the profession at higher rates than teachers of any other state.

Many public schools cannot afford to reduce class sizes by hiring more teachers or adjust learning spaces for social distancing, Penich-Thacker said. 

“Save Our Schools Arizona calls upon the governor and Legislature to prioritize the lives of 1.1 million Arizona children by adding $645 million to the existing public education budget to allow school districts to implement basic CDC recommendations and invest in digital infrastructure for communities, children and families for whom returning to school is not a viable option,” Penich-Thacker said.

A recent poll shows that the Invest In Education Act, a statewide ballot initiative seeking to increase K-12 funding, has strong support from voters, even during this time of economic uncertainty.

If the Invest in Education Act is approved by voters, then individuals earning more than $250,000 a year and households earning more than $500,000 a year would pay a 3.5 percent surcharge on the taxable income they earn in excess of $250,000 for individuals or $500,000 for households. Based on Arizona Department of Revenue models, it would generate $940 million annually for teachers, counselors, therapists, support staff, vocational education and other critical services, said David Lujan, director of The Arizona Center for Economic Progress, who helped draft the initiative.

Polling shows that if the election were held today, six in ten voters would vote yes on the proposition, including more than half who would strongly vote yes.

Right now, hundreds of volunteers and paid circulators are gathering thousands of signatures to place the Invest in Education Act on the ballot, and they’re on pace to gather the 237,645 signatures required by the July 2 deadline.

Confirmed COVID-19 cases in Arizona rose to 21,250 today from 20,123 yesterday, and 941 have died from the virus, said the Arizona Department of Health.

In Maricopa County, there are 10,536 confirmed cases of COVID-19, 2,496 in Pima County, 1,957 in Navajo County, 1,173 in Coconino County, 909 in Pinal County, 300 in Yavapai County, 1,569 in Apache County, 1,275 in Yuma County, 409 in Mohave County, 89 in Cochise County, 365 in Santa Cruz County, 37 in Graham County, 92 in La Paz County, 35 in Gila County and 8 in Greenlee County.

Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high 6-2-COVID-Summary

Developing cultural competence is critical for medical workers, educators and most people for their day to day interactions at work and beyond. Here are five ways to develop it.

Expect More Arizona talks about the value of diversity in education.

The National Education Association sent a letter to congressional leadership calling for meaningful police reform legislation, and 422 other organizations have signed it so far.

Students in Cleveland help clean up some of the broken windows of stores that were looted.

Arizona Democrats have requested a special legislative session to address police reform after the deaths of George Floyd and Dion Johnson in police custody.

Two Arizona Legislators met with Gov. Doug Ducey who has agreed to meet with the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and Black Mothers Forum.

Tucson Magee Middle School girls took first place in creative problem solving. in the Odyssey of the Mind World finals held virtually because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The possibility of a spike in COVID-19 led Tucson Unified School District to cancel graduation ceremonies later this month.

College professors seek information and support as colleges reassure students about their plans for the Fall.

Dysart Unified celebrated staff honored for leadership and dedication.

Chandler Unified honors graduation seniors with yearbook style social media posts.

Scottsdale Unified offers free meals for students over the summer.

Updated June 1: Supt. of Public Instruction Kathy Hoffman released the Roadmap for Reopening Schools developed by the Arizona Department of Education this morning so schools can determine what back to school will be like for their students and teachers after campuses were closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

“While our coming school year will also look different from years past, and as the entire world grapples with the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, I take heart knowing that our schools will continue to be bedrocks of support, comfort, and stability,” Supt. Hoffman said.

The recommendations were developed with the help of public health experts and school leaders statewide.

“It provides a series of recommendations for how schools can approach the 2020-2021 school year and offers adaptable considerations to meet each community’s unique needs,” Supt. Hoffman said. “Given the fluidity of the public health situation, this will be a living document that will be updated based on the most current information.”

Click here to read the recommendations including considerations for students, families, teachers and school leaders.

Americas School Counselor Association and the National Association of School Psychologists released their School Reentry Considerations document today also.

As teachers in the greater Phoenix area closed down their classrooms they said it’s good to see that students have been kind and worked through difficulty like they’re taught all year long.

Education Week looks at what teachers should learn from the death of George Floyd, an unarmed black man killed while being arrested by Minneapolis police.

In a statement released this evening, Supt. of Public Instruction Kathy Hoffman said, “Educators are often the first to see how these injustices and racist systems impact the lives of our students.”

West-MEC shared photos of their drive through recognition cermonies for students.

University of Arizona’s College of Education Dean Bruce Johnson had this to say.

Chandler Unified School District continued to honor their graduates with social media posts.

Arizona Horizon talks tonight with The Black Mothers Forum, a mayor, a former police officer, and a first amendment attorney.

Maricopa Community College held a drive through pinning ceremony for its nursing graduates.

Sign your child up for Scholastic’s Read-a-Palooza here.

Teachers grieve with students, Education Week says.

Tempe Elementary School District urged community members to stay home and stay safe.

Confirmed COVID-19 cases in Arizona rose to 20,123 today from 19,936 yesterday, and 917 have died from the virus, said the Arizona Department of Health.

In Maricopa County, there are 9,927 confirmed cases of COVID-19, 2,382 in Pima County, 1,873 in Navajo County, 1,155 in Coconino County, 865 in Pinal County, 297 in Yavapai County, 1,526 in Apache County, 1,131 in Yuma County, 403 in Mohave County, 76 in Cochise County, 330 in Santa Cruz County, 32 in Graham County, 79 in La Paz County, 31 in Gila County and 6 in Greenlee County.

Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high 6-1-COVID-Summary

Updated May 31: Confirmed COVID-19 cases in Arizona rose to 19,936 today from 17,763 Friday, and 906 have died from the virus, said the Arizona Department of Health.

In Maricopa County, there are 9,815 confirmed cases of COVID-19, 2,368 in Pima County, 1,866 in Navajo County, 1,151 in Coconino County, 863 in Pinal County, 297 in Yavapai County, 1,524 in Apache County, 1,105 in Yuma County, 396 in Mohave County, 74 in Cochise County, 330 in Santa Cruz County, 32 in Graham County, 78 in La Paz County, 31 in Gila County and 6 in Greenlee County.

Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high 5-31-COVID-SUmmary

Updated May 29: Save Our Schools Arizona calls upon the Arizona Legislature to avoid any and all cuts to the existing public K-12 education budget, now that Gov. Ducey said schools will re-open for the next school year.

“Arizona children should not share the pain of budget cuts when they have already suffered chronic financial neglect for decades, which has resulted in the second-most crowded classrooms in the nation and among the worst educator-to-student ratios in multiple categories,” said Dawn Penich-Thacker, Ph.D., co-founder and communications director for Save Our Schools Arizona.

Instead of a single cut to public education or a diversion of public funds to for-profit and private schemes like vouchers, “micro-grants” or online charter schools, Save Our Schools Arizona calls on the Arizona Legislature and governor to add at least $300 million to the public education budget during the special session on budget in order for schools to implement basic safety precautions and address the technology and infrastructure gaps needed to allow all students to learn in digital environments, regardless of family income.

“There is no acceptable path forward that includes further damage to Arizona’s public schools via budget cuts, privatization schemes or deferred funding,” Penich-Thacker said. “We urge Arizona’s elected officials to prioritize and protect the 1.1 million Arizona children in public schools because without strong schools, we have no chance of rebuilding a strong state.”

Arizona School Boards Association sent out a release to school leaders today that it’s ready to partner with them as they prepare for the school year ahead as COVID-19 continues.

Arizona’s public school leaders are focused on the challenges of getting students back-to-school, and the COVID-19 pandemic makes that more complex. Opening schools will look different than it ever has before and approaches will vary from district to district. 

On Monday, June 1, the Arizona Department of Education will release a resource to support districts with guidelines and recommendations for re-opening schools. Developed by a task force of more than 70 education stakeholders from around the state with diverse backgrounds and experience, including ASBA, the “Roadmap for Reopening Schools” will include critical areas of this process.  

ASBA will co-host a series of webinars in coming weeks related to the “Roadmap for Reopening Schools” with Arizona Department of Education, Arizona School Administrators and Arizona Association of School Business Officials. Details and links to register for the webinars, which will cover health, strategic planning, and school finance and will be available early next week.

“In addition, ASBA is working together with other education stakeholders to urge the Legislature to hold a special session to address school finance issues before school begins,” said Dr. Sheila Harrison-Williams, executive director of Arizona School Boards Association.

Issues that ASBA is advocating for include:

  • A limit on enrollment decline to provide budget stability throughout the year
  • Flexibility on attendance requirements to allow students to be counted as enrolled and attending to prevent automatic withdrawal.
  • Ensure that districts are held harmless in transportation funding if they run fewer miles, or are able to receive reimbursement for extra miles that must be driven related to following CDC guidelines (e.g. fewer students on a bus means more route miles for the same students)
  • School finance waiver authority for ADE to address technical issues that arise during the school year without the need for Legislation.

HighGround‘s latest statewide survey of 400 likely voters conducted May 18 through 22 shows Arizona voters think the state’s schools, hospitals and utilities responded well to the COVID-19 pandemic so far.

Arizona’s hospitals and health providers have increased testing and shared helpful information on how to stay healthy. Voters appreciated those efforts giving them the top ranking with 68% of Republicans, 61% of Democrats and 56% of Independents rating their performance as Excellent or Very Good.

Power and water utilities increased their help for people facing economic challenges, delayed shut-ffs for nonpayment and waived late fees, and voters ranked them second.

Schools shifted instruction distance learning, held online meetings, and provided food and other services for those in need. Voters appreciated those efforts, and 55% of Republicans, 54.4% of Democrats and 53.4% of people with children at home ranked them Excellent or Very Good.

But “voters expressed concerns with President Trump’s handling of the pandemic, and the challenges facing Arizona’s long-term care facilities have not gone unnoticed,” said a press release from Paul Bentz, senior vice president of research and Strategy at HighGround Public Affairs Consultants.

Confirmed COVID-19 cases in Arizona rose to 18,465 today from 17,763 yesterday, and 885 have died from the virus, said the Arizona Department of Health Services.

In Maricopa County, there are 9,112 confirmed cases of COVID-19, 2,234 in Pima County, 1,752 in Navajo County, 1,104 in Coconino County, 814 in Pinal County, 295 in Yavapai County, 1,414 in Apache County, 929 in Yuma County, 369 in Mohave County, 67 in Cochise County, 262 in Santa Cruz County, 27 in Graham County, 54 in La Paz County, 28in Gila County and 4 in Greenlee County.

Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high 5-29-Summary

People 20 to 44 years old had the largest number of confirmed COVID-19 cases at 7,335, followed by people 65 years and older with 3,709 cases, then people 45 to 54 years old with 3,022 cases, people from 55 to 64 years old with 2,713 cases and people under 20 years old with 1,673 cases, according to the Arizona Department of Health Services.

Twenty-seven percent of confirmed COVID-19 cases are in people of unknown race/ethnicity, 26% in White/Non-Hispanic, 24% in Hispanic or Latino, 15% Native American, 4% Black/Non-Hispanic and 1% Asian/ Pacific Islander and 3% Other/Non-Hispanic.

Twenty-nine percent of people who had confirmed COVID-19 cases had a chronic medical condition and 40% were high risk – 65 or more years old with one or more chronic medical condition. Fifty-three percent of people with confirmed cases of COVID-19 are female.

Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high 5-29-Confirmed-COVID-Cases-by-Day

Forty-nine percent of COVID-19 deaths were in White/Non-Hispanic people, 10% in people of unknown race/ethnicity, 19% Native American, 16% Hispanic or Latino, 3% Black/Non-Hispanic and 1% Asian/ Pacific Islander and 1% Other/Non-Hispanic.

More men, 55%, than women, and more people 65 years old or older – 690 – have died from COVID-19 in Arizona.

Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high 5-29-COVID-deaths

There were 342 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in congregate settings such as assisted living, long-term care facilities, prisons, rehab facilities, hospitals, shelters, workplace, dialysis clinics, private residential, hospice, childcare/daycare, college/university, outpatient clinics and religious facilities.

Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high 5-29-Congregate-settings

Chandler Unified summer sports and activities start June 8th.

Here are some ways states can make sure education technology is used equitably.

Updated May 28: Gov. Doug Ducey said schools will re-open for the first day of school after closing for COVID-19 earlier this school year, and the Arizona Department of Education said it will release guidance on how to do that on Monday, June 1.

“As school leaders prepare for the 2020-21 school year, the Arizona Department of Education will issue guidance to serve as a roadmap for preparing for a variety of learning options that keep students and teachers safe,” said the Office of Supt. of Public Education Kathy Hoffman in a press release.

“This document, created by a broad group of education leaders, public health officials, and stakeholders, will provide adaptable, flexible recommendations, considerations, and resources for districts and charters to plan for the upcoming academic year,” said the Office of Supt. of Public Education Kathy Hoffman in the press release.

Arizona Dept. of Health Services video: COVID-19 news conference May 28, 2020

“I was able to meet with school leaders and superintendents from around the state earlier this week,” Gov. Ducey said. “I want to thank these people, our hard-working teachers, principals and superintendents, we all had a curve ball that came at us in March. They did especially because they were in the middle of the school year. They switched almost immediately to distance learning.”

Gov. Ducey said he’s met with school leaders to talk about what’s starting next year will look like.

Supt. of Public Instruction Kathy Hoffman led the meeting, and the input from school leaders was helpful, Gov. Ducey said.

“The good news was no matter where someone was or their role in the system, they were eager to get back inside a classroom,” Gov. Ducey said.

Schools are seeking guidance and flexibility to tailor it to the needs of their specific school districts “and the situation that we still have in the State of Arizona,” Gov. Ducey said.

Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high Gov-Ducey-and-school-guidance-slide

‘The announcement today is that schools will resume at the start of the school year,” Gov. Ducey said. “We’re planning ahead. Supt. Hoffman will release guidance for schools on Monday, June 1st. This guidance has been formed by, of course, school leaders, teachers, parents and public health experts from the Arizona Department of Health Services.”

Also, Gov. Ducey said there will be an executive order to support schools that includes flexibility around child-care ratios with a responsible plan developed by AZ Dept. of Health Services that will protect students and allow increased childcare capacity.

“In the meantime, organized youth activities can resume,” Gov. Ducey said, noting that means summer leagues, summer schools and day camps. “There is guidance to allow youth sports to resume safely and responsibly.”

“We have schools that start up in July and summer schools that start up next week, and we said we’re good to go on that,” Gov. Ducey said.

‘There’s a lot of public health reasons we want kids in school. They provide a lot of services besides education. We know they can do this, because childcare providers are doing this now,” said Dr. Cara Christ, director of the Arizona Department of Health Services.

When asked if there are plans to provide schools more funding so they can increase social distancing and

“We’ve not spent all the federal dollars and at this time we have federal education dollars that have come to our state. That along with our rainy day fund will be examined so we can safely open our schools for our students and school employees,” Gov. Ducey said.

Dr. Christ said they’re also taking into account how they can meet the needs of students and also keep family members who may be more vulnerable to COVID-19 safe.

Gov. Ducey said Arizona’s actions in re-opening will depend on reductions in COVID-like illnesses, and the state will respond if there are flare-ups statewide or in certain areas.

Gov. Ducey said there has been a beginning of a downward trend and that will be monitored.

Diagnostic tests have risen sharply during the Arizona Testing Blitz, while the number of people testing positive for COVID-19 has decreased in the past five weeks, Gov. Ducey said.

There has been a slight uptick in intensive care unit hospital beds on May 24th and 26th, but there is still plenty of availability, Gov. Ducey said.

Dr. Christ said they are currently working on testing all residents and staff in about 147 Medicare certified skilled nursing facilities in Arizona.

“We are working to ramp up the testing in our assisted living facilities,” Dr. Christ said, noting there are about 2,300 assisted living facilities in the state.

Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high 5-28-Dr-Cara-Christ

The Arizona Department of Health Services is also working on getting correctional officers access to antibody testing, providing support to the Navajo Nation and monitoring increasing COVID-19 cases in Yuma County.

A surge line has helped Arizona hospitals whose patients need a higher or lower level of care and has helped in the transfer of 400 patients to the appropriate level of care throughout the state and that the care is considered in-network by their insurance, Dr. Christ said.

Confirmed COVID-19 cases in Arizona rose to 17,763 today from 17,262 yesterday, and 857 have died from the virus, said the Arizona Department of Health Services.

In Maricopa County, there are 8,896 confirmed cases of COVID-19, 2,167 in Pima County, 1,678 in Navajo County, 1,078 in Coconino County, 788 in Pinal County, 294 in Yavapai County, 1,290 in Apache County, 822 in Yuma County, 350 in Mohave County, 67 in Cochise County, 225 in Santa Cruz County, 26 in Graham County, 53 in La Paz County, 25 in Gila County and 4 in Greenlee County.

Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high 5-28-summary

Updated May 27: Tourists crowding areas statewide on Memorial Day weekend and a sharp increase in people going to hospital emergency rooms with COVID-19 symptoms and illness are fueling concerns cases numbers may increase in the next two weeks – the virus’ incubation period.

Confirmed COVID-19 cases in Arizona rose to 17,262 today from 16,783 yesterday, and 831 have died from the virus, said the Arizona Department of Health Services.

In Maricopa County, there are 8,627 confirmed cases of COVID-19, 2,119 in Pima County, 1,652 in Navajo County, 1,066 in Coconino County, 777 in Pinal County, 292 in Yavapai County, 1,250 in Apache County, 782 in Yuma County, 339 in Mohave County, 63 in Cochise County, 188 in Santa Cruz County, 25 in Graham County, 54 in La Paz County, 25 in Gila County and 3 in Greenlee County.

Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high 5-27-summary

Now that the Arizona Senate has ended the legislative session without voting on a House bill that would reduce businesses’ liability for COVID-19 related claims, many wait for a legislative special session to deal with Arizonans’ concerns.

As people return to work, learn more about workplace safety guidelines during COVID-19 in a webinar tomorrow morning.

Unemployment claims in Arizona reached 600,000 since Gov. Doug Ducey’s COVID-19 Stay Home, Stay Safe order began.

People 20 to 44 years old had the largest number of confirmed COVID-19 cases at 6,809, followed by people 65 years and older with 3,552 cases, then people 45 to 54 years old with 2,838 cases, people from 55 to 64 years old with 2,545 cases and people under 20 years old with 1,507 cases, according to the Arizona Department of Health Services.

Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high 5-27-Confirmed-COVID-Cases-by-Day

Forty percent of confirmed COVID-19 cases are in people of unknown race/ethnicity, 21% in White/Non-Hispanic, 21% in Hispanic or Latino, 12% Native American, 3% Black/Non-Hispanic and 1% Asian/ Pacific Islander and 2% Other/Non-Hispanic.

Twenty-nine percent of people who had confirmed COVID-19 cases had a chronic medical condition and 40% were high risk – 65 or more years old with one or more chronic medical condition. Fifty-three percent of people with confirmed cases of COVID-19 are female.

Forty-one percent of COVID-19 deaths were in White/Non-Hispanic people, 21% in people of unknown race/ethnicity, 16% Native American, 16% Hispanic or Latino, 3% Black/Non-Hispanic and 1% Asian/ Pacific Islander and 2% Other/Non-Hispanic.

More men, 55%, than women, and more people 65 years old or older – 651 – have died from COVID-19 in Arizona.

Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high 5-27-deaths

There were 330 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in congregate settings such as assisted living, long-term care facilities, prisons, rehab facilities, hospitals, shelters, workplace, dialysis clinics, private residential, hospice, childcare/daycare, college/university, outpatient clinics and religious facilities.

Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high 5-27-Congregate-Settings

Gov. Doug Ducey said today during an event with eight mayors from around the state that the Arizona Cares Fund will provide more than $440 million to Arizona cities, towns and counties that did not receive direct funding earlier this year from the federal government.

Click here for allocations from the AZCares Fund.

With temperatures in the 100s this week, Arizonans are reminded to check to make sure they don’t leave children or pets in the car in the heat.

SomeBurros is giving away free meals for anyone in need at Tempe Diablo Stadium today.

There will be COVID-19 testing at 40 sites on Saturday, May 30, so get details and pre-register.

School leaders and state officials are working together to make sure students and teachers return to safe classrooms when school starts.

With most high school graduations being celebrated online or with drive through ceremonies, KJZZ 91.5 FM is sharing some seniors’ speeches.

Tucson Unified reminds community members that they are providing free summer meals for kids during summer break.

Paradise Valley Unified School District is celebrating graduates on electronic billboards.

Northern Arizona University celebrates students and alumni with Lumberjack Spotlights.

A report proposes a new way to end the funding inequities between American public schools.

ASU students to provide design work around Roden Crater.

Education Foundation of Yuma County honors longtime Rotarian and Teacher of the Year organizer.

Do your kids have questions about COVID-19? Submit them and watch a new edition of The ABC’s of COVID-19..

Updated May 26: The Arizona Department of Health Services said review of several projections and models indicate the state can meet the need for hospital beds and ventilators for COVID-19 patients, said Dr. Cara Christ in a blog post this morning.

The Arizona Senate met and voted to adjourn sine die, but they are expected to return in a few months for a special session to address COVID-19 issues.

Confirmed COVID-19 cases in Arizona rose to 16,783 today from 16,561 yesterday, and 807 have died from the virus, said the Arizona Department of Health Services.

In Maricopa County, there are 8,448 confirmed cases of COVID-19, 2,075 in Pima County, 1,550 in Navajo County, 1,041 in Coconino County, 766 in Pinal County, 291 in Yavapai County, 1,214 in Apache County, 717 in Yuma County, 329 in Mohave County, 64 in Cochise County, 187 in Santa Cruz County, 23 in Graham County, 51 in La Paz County, 24 in Gila County and 3 in Greenlee County.

Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high 5-26-Summary

There will be COVID-19 testing at 40 sites on Saturday, May 30, so get details and pre-register.

People 20 to 44 years old had the largest number of confirmed COVID-19 cases at 6,610, followed by people 65 years and older with 3,463 cases, then people 45 to 54 years old with 2,768 cases, people from 55 to 64 years old with 2,491 cases and people under 20 years old with 1,443 cases, according to the Arizona Department of Health Services.

Forty percent of confirmed COVID-19 cases are in people of unknown race/ethnicity, 21% in White/Non-Hispanic, 20% in Hispanic or Latino, 12% Native American, 3% Black/Non-Hispanic and 1% Asian/ Pacific Islander and 2% Other/Non-Hispanic.

Twenty-nine percent of people who had confirmed COVID-19 cases had a chronic medical condition and 40% were high risk – 65 or more years old with one or more chronic medical condition. Fifty-three percent of people with confirmed cases of COVID-19 are female.

Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high 5-26-Confirmed-COVID-cases-by-Day

Forty-two percent of COVID-19 deaths were in White/Non-Hispanic people, 20% in people of unknown race/ethnicity, 16% Native American, 16% Hispanic or Latino, 3% Black/Non-Hispanic and 1% Asian/ Pacific Islander and 1% Other/Non-Hispanic.

More men, 55%, than women, and more people 65 years old or older – 633 – have died from COVID-19 in Arizona.

Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high 5-26-deaths

There were 324 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in congregate settings such as assisted living, long-term care facilities, prisons, rehab facilities, hospitals, shelters, workplace, dialysis clinics, private residential, hospice, childcare/daycare, college/university, outpatient clinics and religious facilities.

Increase in COVID-19 cases marks a new daily high 5-26-Congregate-settings

A Metro Tech senior’s story from school closures to graduations is highlighted in this AZPreps365 story.

Check out this video with quick ways to build students’ excitement for daily writing activities.

Crane School District will be distributing food boxes to families in need on Thursday this week.

Looking for ideas for STEM activities at home? Then tune into this webinar.

Eighty-nine Scottsdale Unified teachers earned their National Board certification.

See this article for ways to help students deal with their anger and frustration due to COVID-19.

Dysart Unified reminds people they can still respond to the 2020 Census.

Chandler Unified continue to honor graduates with yearbook social media posts.

School leaders discuss immediate and long-term solutions to serve children during COVID-19.

What is it like being a Flinn Scholar? Watch this short video to find out.

The National Parent Teacher Association reminds people that mental health matters and there are people here for you.

Hear what college leaders, including ASU’s Dr. Michael Crow have to say about public universities and COVID during a virtual discussion tomorrow.

Deer Valley’s newest school’s construction is ahead of schedule.

Related articles

Updates from May 20 – 25: AZ Dept. of Ed releases COVID-19 guidance to schools for summer programs, back to school

Updates from May 11 – 19: Arizonans consider workplace safety, what back to school will look like amid COVID-19

Updates from April 26 – May 10: Stores re-open, COVID-19 testing blitz resumes on Saturday

Updates from April 8 – 25: You can get tested now if you think you’ve been exposed to COVID-19

Updates from March 12 – April 7: Coronavirus response: Cases rise; AZ Day of Giving